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Thread: Annoying Parents - Vol 2 Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-04-2013 11:05 AM
marshies You'll have to pick your battles with your family. Maybe dog food is one you won't win since you aren't the one paying. There are worse things you can do to a dog than feeding Iams. I think if you are holding your ground on training and exercise, the dog will grow up to be better than most.

Good luck!
01-04-2013 11:02 AM
gaia_bear I really like the idea of the puppy allowance maybe you can put some sort of barter system in place, ie: I do this, you give me that. Are there any small jobs in your area that you can pick up and do after school? Any kids in your class you may be able to tutor for some extra money?

One thing to point out, you may think your parents can afford the more expensive food but I know most of the time parents for the most part keep their finances seperate from their children.

You're doing a great job with Zack, can't wait to hear how training goes
01-04-2013 11:02 AM
Adrian The poop difference is astonishing. Size texture, wetness etc. quality food makes picking up poop considerably less disgusting .

I think this may be a winning argument. Depends who picks it up though.....


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01-04-2013 10:34 AM
Lilie My husband didn't buy into the whole 'more expensive food is better for your dog' until he saw the poop difference. Perhaps you can show your folks the comparison.
01-04-2013 10:10 AM
Bear GSD Hi Adam,
I'm sorry that your parents are not on the same page as you when it comes to Zack. Maybe you could talk to your parents and let them know that it was your understanding that you would take care of the puppy and maybe they could agree to give you a puppy allowance every month so that you are responsible to buy food and other things to take care of Zack. Let them know that you want to be responsible for Zack and taking care of him (wink wink)

Honestly what everyone said is true, as long as Zack is loved and taken care for he will be ok. Keep up the great work Adam
01-04-2013 09:16 AM
carmspack Adam the food the vet recommended may not be much better , honestly, and cost a great deal more.

I see the dog is "your" pup , and often parents allow a pup/dog into the household after there is some begging and bargaining from the child , and there are conditions from the parents expecting that child to "care for" groom , exercise , be committed to spend time with the dog .

So instead of fighting with your parents assert yourself . There is a difference. Tell them that you will hold up your end of the "contract" and they can enjoy a happy healthy pup which requires no effort on their behalf.

Tell them that there are cost-saving health benefits to when a dog is properly and well fed . Vet visits dramatically lessened -- longer life potential, better skin, better digestion , less stool - everyone likes that ! , and for old age , less age-related problems such as arthritis.

Parental units may argue , 'well he looks just fine' - which indeed he may , because the dog is well set up and brand spanking new , the wear and tear of living and the accummulative effect of sub-par or marginal nutrition have not made an impact yet . But ! come mid-age there is a peak and then it is a cascade of things needing attention.

All this applies to your own health and diet as well.
01-04-2013 08:46 AM
Speedy2662 Thank you all for your stories. It helps a lot I know that most dogs live on way worse food, but my parents can afford that food and they just do it to annoy me...
01-03-2013 10:42 PM
ankittanna87 Hey Adam, like everyone who has said this, I really feel bad for you & all I can say is don't worry, once u grow up & move out, you will be able to live your life on your terms & that includes Zack! Since you don't have an option now, leave it be.. I know pedigree sucks big time but apparently a lot of dogs have survived well on it.. I'm in India & a lot of dog owners aren't into dog foods (it hasn't picked up momentum), people still feed their adult dogs bread & milk :| that being said, the dogs are healthy & active..

The only concern I have is, Zack getting loose motions because of the sudden switch in food.. Avoid that as much as possible (I know it's hard with such parents but try).. Don't change his diet frequently, they aren't like humans & their tummies are SUPER SENSITIVE to change.. I learnt it the hard way!

And yes, puppies CAN have adult dog food without any problems.. Kaiser is on TOTW (which has the same food for adult dogs & pups) it's just the quantity that needs to be kept in check.. Hope this helps
01-03-2013 08:45 PM
Kyleigh And to help you out with another story, while it is cat related ... it's the same idea ... growing up we had two cats that ate tender vittles all their lives ... they lived to 19 and 21 - they were only vaccinated twice in their lives and were indoor / outdoor cats.
01-03-2013 08:01 PM
sparra
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevenzachsmom View Post
Adam,, You're such a great kid and you try so hard. Sadly, parents can be difficult and there isn't much you can do. If it makes you feel any better, I will tell you about my first dog....I was only 4 years old and this was in 1962. My puppy was a hound from a litter some guy had at my Dad's work.

The puppy was free. We got him at no more than 6 weeks old. He came home to me in my Dad's pocket. He was the runt of the litter. He was a neurotic hound dog. He lived outside a lot. I don't think he was ever completely housebroken. But....despite everything we did wrong (and there was plenty). The dog was really none the worse for wear. He was loved. He had a pretty decent life and he lived for 17 years.

Our dogs really do survive, in spite of our mistakes. At least Zack has you. You make all the difference and Zack will be fine.
Haha......yes....I feel so old saying this but.....when I was your age our dogs survived on the cheapest dog foods available......they were the only ones available and there would have been no way my parents would have spent the money that is required on the premium dog foods on today's market. Don't be overly concerned. I am not sure how old you are but when i was 13 I started working at our next door neighbours turkey farm (very glamorous) to help pay for the food my very large dog ate.....is there anything around you could try to help pay for the more expensive food??
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