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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-11-2014 01:58 PM
bruiser My GSD tries to bully my old black lab, he is very jealous and possessive. I have to be swift and vigilant when he attempts this behavior. If my lab is on the bed or couch with me and he tries to flea bite squeeze in, he is immediately made to lay on the floor next to the couch or bed. I don't allow that behavior at all between them. My lab is about 14 yrs old and now has a degenerative eye illness and arthritis (just like me). She deserves to live out her senior yrs without being bullied.

The good thing about bruiser (GSD) is he is also very protective and pack oriented and would never let anything happen to my lab stella. He actually adores her. I love them both with all my heart
07-11-2014 12:42 PM
wolfy dog Update: after playing these games several times, he is a changed dog!! He fetches reliably, not trying to outsmart me anymore and biddable. This is the dog I wanted to see. Thanks for all the tips! But I am keeping in mind that he still has to go a long way towards adulthood. But at least I am having fun with him now!
07-11-2014 11:11 AM
Mary Beth
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juliem24 View Post
MaryBeth, that just makes so much sense to me (your description of the fake fight over the deer carcass). I'm sure that I can find at least one or two things Rudy the Rude could learn from that exercise ...thanks, I learned something valuable from this whole discussion...every post was enlightening. When adolescent dogs and pre-teen kids act up in this home, they're usually in NILIF, but when you add in a game too, they could learn a lot more from it. Kinda like when I'm coaching basketball, I make em go harder at each other when I'm aggravated with them...within the game.
Excellent point! My vet told me also that this game is also good for the human. I find it to be an great stress reliever and good exercise. Interesting that the harder I play the game, the more Sting enjoy it.
07-10-2014 02:16 PM
wolfy dog Another fun game: put all his toys in a bucket and let him fetch them one after the other.
07-10-2014 05:53 AM
Arlene/Archer OP, I've an elderly tabby cat here and a 2 year old intact GSD who spent the ENTIRE first year of his life obsessed with the cat to the point of driving us all up the walls. Fast forward a year and neither he or the cat have any real interest in each other. I found that concentrating on Archer's love of games while the cat was present was really helpful, he'd ditch bothering that cat in a second for a game. It also helped that our cat is a smart little bugger and never ran when he was charged- which frankly, citing size disparity - is really brave of him.
Either way, with training and controlled exposure your dog and smaller dog will find a way to co-exist in harmony, I'm sure of it. Check out photo I took recently of cat strolling under Archer's belly as evidence
07-09-2014 09:34 PM
Mary Beth
Quote:
Originally Posted by llombardo View Post
Do you have a picture if what you use? You start with both, then scoot one to him, where is the other one? Within his view, behind you? What if they don't chase you for the second one? I see the idea behind it, but I'm not sure I can get mine to follow? Your down on the ground eye level with the dog right?
I use 2 foot long tugs one handle. I got them from Leerburg. Though I think any kind would work as long as it can be attached to a lead. I do use 6 ft. 1/2 inch leashes because they are easy to attach and I have handles to hold on to. I do wear leather gloves. At the beginning Sting has to wait on the down or sit stay by the house while I walk out holding both tugs up. I walk about 20 ft. go out of his sight then come back. If he tries to get up - I walk up again to the house and give the hand signal to go back down which he does. So this builds up the pregame excitement. Then I turn and face him and lower my hand that holds the tugs - and scoot one on the ground - I hold the other behind me - he will come charging out right at it - so I have it turn - he grabs it - I drop the other in back of me and get a close grip on the tug by the handle so the tugging can being - then I act tired let go but quickly grab the other one and run - he drops his tug and chases after mine - and soon. It does go fast - if he should get both tugs that doesn't stop me - I keep pulling one then the other - sometimes he will loosen one up and I ran with that one. My Sting is big 30 inches tall and I am a little over 5 ft. so it is very easy to get nose to nose. My Sting is also greedy he wants both tugs, so when I have the second one he chases after me and drops his to grab mine - that is how I got him to fetch with a ball - i use 2 balls. For your dogs, I would start with the one that has the highest prey drive - if the dog is smaller and you are much bigger then think of yourself as the wolf and your dog as the coyote but you are both fighting over the deer. So try hunching yours shoulders and staring and growling like a wolf would do. The dog with high drive like mine will react by biting down harder and biting further up the tug to get at the handle.
07-09-2014 01:35 PM
Lilie I have a high drive Lacy (2 years old now). I call him my crack puppy. When he is focused on something, he is intense.

I have an older (rescue) Mini Dachshund. She rarely plays. She likes to be a total 100% lap dog.

My Lacy has a fixation on the Doxie. It's her reaction that has him hooked. When she tries to correct him for being pushy, she squeals. He simply can't get enough of her. He is pushy 24/7 with her. Even when they pass eachother through the doorway (him out / her in or visa versa) he fixates on her and forgets what he was doing.

I have to manage them every moment of the day. He doesn't hurt her -nor is he aggressive towards her, he just pokes and prods and lays on her. He wants her to squeal.

What I'm doing now, it re-directing him when it comes to the doxie. I set aside a specific amount of time every day to work on this. I 'm curious if I can teach him not to fixate on her. During this time I'll have her on my lap (so I can control him and that is where she wants to be anyway). When he focuses on her and I tell him to "leave it" and then I say "Bring it!". I want him to bring me a toy. I'll play fetch with him with one hand, while I protect her with the other.

I've been doing this for less than a month now. We started where he couldn't focus on my command long enough to actually bring me a toy. Now when I have them together and put her on my lap, he brings a toy. He will leave long enough to fetch it and bring it back. He still trys to shove the toy down her throat when he returns, but we are working on that step now.

This might sound like a silly thing to do - take so long to teach something. But if you could see how difficult it is for him to break that over the top fixation he has long enough to fetch the toy - I am very proud of where he is at now. And it has increased his drive in playing fetch. I now use the same toy as a reward in Agility, where before it was treats.
07-09-2014 01:13 PM
wolfy dog I played that game this morning. He immediately outsmarted me by getting hold of both; lesson one.
I didn't get a chance to fix these tug toys with a piece of rope but I am going to. His intensity was high and there were a few close calls regarding hitting my hands; lesson two.
Also make sure you have equally interesting toys as he taught me that it is easier to let the second choice toy go than the first choice; lesson three. hen I walked over with a treat he willing let go of the toys. Good boy, D!
I think I played it about 10 minutes and he is toast. I loved this game; lots of thinking, interaction and plain fun for both of us. But watch those teeth!
07-09-2014 12:25 AM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfy dog View Post
This is kinda like working with two flirt poles? At the end of the game I picture you walking away while he has possession of both tugs, right? Then you walk over to him, give him a treat and pick up both tugs? What is his response? He doesn't try the keep-away-game before you have a chance to give him the treats?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary Beth View Post
It is a mixture of flirt poles and tug. The idea to recreate a hunt 2 wolves fighting over a deer- we are both trying to keep the prey. So once he pounces on one tug I grab the tug by the handle and pull. He pulls back - sometimes I growl - since he is big it is easy to get nose to nose - it really helps to play act - be serious this dinner we are fighting over. I will then weaken and drop that tug but then quickly pick up the other and run - he pounces on that and again I pull, so the game continues until he wins. The idea is to encourage him thru this play to bite , pull, everything that is not allowed outside of the game. Now, at the end of the game when I walk away about 20 ft. he is mouthing the tugs and watching me - I turn when I get to the house and then praise him and ask him to bring me the tugs for a treat - he picks up both in his big mouth and brings them to me. He gives them to me in exchange for the treat and praise and a good rub down. It is interesting that right after tug when we go inside the house and he is thirsty - he will wait until I take a glass of water and stand by his bowl - then we both drink. This whole tug game satisfies his prey drive - he gets to chase - bite and keep the prey. I was astonished that he does this on his own -everything else was an uphill work - he would try something once just to see if it was worth his while then decide it wasn't. But thru this game since I do it after the obedience work - it has reached him and gotten his cooperation. I am wondering if your Ddog may react the same way.
Do you have a picture if what you use? You start with both, then scoot one to him, where is the other one? Within his view, behind you? What if they don't chase you for the second one? I see the idea behind it, but I'm not sure I can get mine to follow? Your down on the ground eye level with the dog right?
07-09-2014 12:13 AM
Juliem24 MaryBeth, that just makes so much sense to me (your description of the fake fight over the deer carcass). I'm sure that I can find at least one or two things Rudy the Rude could learn from that exercise ...thanks, I learned something valuable from this whole discussion...every post was enlightening. When adolescent dogs and pre-teen kids act up in this home, they're usually in NILIF, but when you add in a game too, they could learn a lot more from it. Kinda like when I'm coaching basketball, I make em go harder at each other when I'm aggravated with them...within the game.
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