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Thread: Nerves and thresholds. Protection training and aggression Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-04-2014 01:25 AM
lalachka
Quote:
Originally Posted by Castlemaid View Post
Here is a favorite article about nerves, temperament, thresholds, and bite-work. A bit long, but well worth the read, and in my opinion, should be required reading for all GSD owners, not to mention breeders!



Elements of Temperament - Scratch My Butt



When I set out to get a GSD for SchH/IPO, I did NOT want a nerve bag, or a reactive low-threshold dog. I wanted a solid, high-threshold dog, friendly and outgoing with people, safe with kids and cats, good out in public, versatile in different activities, a joy to own and train, but also kick-butt serious in the protection field. My choice and preference came from being involved in Schutzhund with my rescue mixed-breed, and training and working with a variety of different GSDs in my SchH club. Some dogs were low-threshold and quick to react and bite, some were serious in the fight, but bidabble and sane and solid, some where all prey-drive with not a serious bone in their body, some were nicely balanced, being successful in trials, and great, all-around pets.



I love to talk about Gryff and people may be getting bored of hearing about him, but he is exactly what I wanted. At club, in seminars, police-dog trainers, world-level competitors love working him - he kicks butt! But he is one of the nicest, most even-tempered, well-rounded dogs that I can take anywhere. High threshold, safe in public, from weirdos in town pretending that they are superheros and air-lazering him as we come around a corner (I just laughed, Gryff cued off my reaction and ignored the person), or little kids running up behind him to pet him (he loves it!). He comes to work with me on most days, has to stay in the car, but breaks and lunch time, we hang out with his work buddies.



Vet is not a problem - shots, examinations, micro-chip implant, he puts up with it with no complaint.



Many others on this forum have bite-trained dog with similar good temperaments and balance as Gryff - in my opinion, this is more the norm than the exception when looking at breeders who understand the true essence of a GSD.

Omg thank you for this article!!!! I'm not done yet but enjoying it already and getting comfy to enjoy the rest)))))
07-03-2014 09:46 PM
lalachka
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhczth View Post
Thresholds are how quickly a dog reacts to stimuli. They tend to increase with age. A dog can have a high threshold for defense or aggression (not the same thing) yet a very low threshold for prey. Or they can be very quick to go into defense or aggression (low threshold) and be very difficult to elicit prey (high threshold). This is separate from nerves though many nervy dogs are low threshold and react quickly to what scares them. Not all. Having high thresholds in all areas can make a dog appear to be very solid almost dull until the right circumstances shows the dog's true nature, especially if the dog has never been truly pushed or faced real challenges in life.

So how would you define nerves? If threshold is how quickly a dog reacts then nerves would be how much is takes to make him react or...?

Also, can you explain the diff between high threshold for defense and high threshold for aggression.
07-03-2014 08:33 PM
lhczth Thresholds are how quickly a dog reacts to stimuli. They tend to increase with age. A dog can have a high threshold for defense or aggression (not the same thing) yet a very low threshold for prey. Or they can be very quick to go into defense or aggression (low threshold) and be very difficult to elicit prey (high threshold). This is separate from nerves though many nervy dogs are low threshold and react quickly to what scares them. Not all. Having high thresholds in all areas can make a dog appear to be very solid almost dull until the right circumstances shows the dog's true nature, especially if the dog has never been truly pushed or faced real challenges in life.
07-03-2014 08:32 PM
Msmaria If your a newbie like me having a trainer who can identify your dogs drives, nerves etc really helps. I found I don't have a dog with the best nerves, they are not the worst but could be better, medium drive and a high threshold. She shown me how to work with him and because of his threshold I can take him lots of places with no reaction as long as I don't push his threshold limits. Which takes a lot.
07-03-2014 08:13 PM
lalachka
Quote:
Originally Posted by glowingtoadfly View Post
Plus it will teach you so much about how to handle your dog better.

Exactly!!! And there will be so many people that will see him and show me what I'm doing wrong. Trust me, I know this is a good option. It just seems like there aren't too many good trainers and clubs in NYC or I don't know how to look
07-03-2014 08:11 PM
glowingtoadfly Plus it will teach you so much about how to handle your dog better.
07-03-2014 08:09 PM
lalachka
Quote:
Originally Posted by glowingtoadfly View Post
It's addictive.

I'll be glad to get addicted then. I'm going to call the club and John. Maybe I will get lucky this time around.
07-03-2014 08:06 PM
glowingtoadfly It's addictive.
07-03-2014 08:06 PM
lalachka
Quote:
Originally Posted by Packen View Post
You can try contacting John Soares and check out what he recommends.

NY Professional Dog Training | NJ Certified Dog Trainer | 973.715.0212

Lol small world. I've been to him already. But you're right, I can ask him. I haven't thought of that.
07-03-2014 08:05 PM
lalachka
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx'girl View Post
Most clubs want dedication....not going regularly won't help the dog succeed for trialing or titling. Clubs also want members to be supportive with each other, that comes with regular attendance.

Pay to trains are a bit different, show up, work your dog, helper hopefully will be fair in the training and that there will be progress achieved.

My club trains one day per week and that isn't enough for me so I pay to train elsewhere during the week too, though I stay on the same consistent program whereever I go.



That said, we are still only at an IPO1 and my dog is 5 yrs old. lol... I hate trialing, love to train.

Their schedule is a little tough. Thursday is out of the question so that leaves Sunday. I'd do my best to make every Sunday but things happen.

Or, if they replied and I went there and got really into it then maybe i'd find a way to make it every session.
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