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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-13-2014 04:34 PM
holland Rorie went through a time when she was busting out of her crate. I was working with a trainer who suggested Susan Garrett Ruff Love-there are some crate games in there -that I used that helped-there are also other exercises that might help you-even if you don't use a crate -there will probably be times that you will need to use a crate. Ror no longer bursts out of her crate...and the games made it fun for me and for her-also sitting until I opened the door-there were exercises that I found very helpful...hope things work out for you
07-12-2014 07:01 PM
Zeeva Maybe a shock collar as per LouCastle's method would help with the sliding door issue...?
07-12-2014 04:30 PM
selzer She is nine, and it is going down hill.

This is why I would get a kennel. I would kennel him a LOT in the months that you have your girl. He will be fine. Take him out daily for a long walk, and to throw the ball and to train him, but give him a good structured schedule and limit the time he spends inside for now. Once your girl has gone to her reward, you can spend more time on your boy's household manners and quirks.

That's just my opinion. He is 18 months old. He shouldn't be the driving force in your home right now.
07-12-2014 04:09 PM
Zeeva
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob_McBob View Post
I don't think it's ever going to come to rehoming, especially when I see the progress I made from old videos of him at the door. He is my dog and I'll do whatever it takes. The reality of the situation is she is 9 and her DM is going downhill pretty fast, so sadly she probably doesn't have that much time left. That's all the more reason for me to not let him make her life miserable.
I'm glad you don't give up easy. I thought about rehoming my Zeeva a bajillion times when she was a pup. But I can't live without her now.

Keep this thread updated...
07-12-2014 04:00 PM
Bob_McBob
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeeva View Post
Wow I commend you for your effort. You're pretty d@mn dedicated. I think for you it might end up being a management case.

Either that or sadly (and I hate to say this) a rehome case?
I don't think it's ever going to come to rehoming, especially when I see the progress I made from old videos of him at the door. He is my dog and I'll do whatever it takes. The reality of the situation is she is 9 and her DM is going downhill pretty fast, so sadly she probably doesn't have that much time left. That's all the more reason for me to not let him make her life miserable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Strom View Post
I'd think more in terms of control Chris. Down is down, period. Down him at the door, but then walk him away from it. Don't always let him out. Open the door, close it again. Heel him out, make him down again. Don't include her. Concentrate on him and making clear what you want. Reward him for being correct with each step. Calm, relaxed rewards. Not a big release that lets him go wild. Does that make sense?
I'll try doing this with him. I'm always very reluctant to get him to down stay like this, because holding him back from the door on a flat collar and trying to keep him in a stay further away is exactly how he built up the crazy drive for the door in the first place. Usually when I'm doing the door training he's constantly moving back and forth at a distance with the door opening and closing until he gets so bored he calms down.
07-12-2014 03:35 PM
Steve Strom I'd think more in terms of control Chris. Down is down, period. Down him at the door, but then walk him away from it. Don't always let him out. Open the door, close it again. Heel him out, make him down again. Don't include her. Concentrate on him and making clear what you want. Reward him for being correct with each step. Calm, relaxed rewards. Not a big release that lets him go wild. Does that make sense?
07-12-2014 03:34 PM
Zeeva Wow I commend you for your effort. You're pretty d@mn dedicated. I think for you it might end up being a management case.

Either that or sadly (and I hate to say this) a rehome case?
07-12-2014 03:23 PM
Bob_McBob Wow! I really appreciate all the kind words and help, everyone

Zeeva:

I've been working privately with a trainer since March. I take him for herding lessons every Friday, but he missed a couple recently because of a leg strain. He does extremely well in the controlled environment of my trainer's facility or in structured sessions in public. Our obedience lessons include her dogs, and he knows he's not allowed to interact with them. He's also great at herding. Working livestock is the only thing I've ever seen him show more interest in than interacting with other dogs, so I know it's perfect for him.

I try to make our obedience sessions fun and mentally stimulating. I use a tug as a reward, which he loves playing with. Every day I drive him to a suburb under construction where we can work in complete isolation. It's even great for loose leash walking since we can go down the middle of huge empty roads with no cars. He understands all basic obedience commands and has no trouble following them when he's focused on me. He's extremely easy to distract. Anything I've only worked on at home like "watch me" (many, many hours with marking and treats) is completely useless.

The crate is a typical collapsible wire model. I used to keep him in a plastic travel crate, but he's too long for the largest models typically available. I'm not too familiar with what's available between collapsible wire crates and the much more expensive solid aluminum working dog crates. I also have the problem that he's atypically long and doesn't really fit comfortably in anything but the largest sizes.

He's not a bad dog. In the right home environment, he would be an amazing dog. He's not constantly attacking my female or anything like that. He doesn't resource guard food, and she will even go over and steal stuff from him given the chance. She's a lifelong nuisance barker and gets worked up often. She's also very uncoordinated because of the DM and makes a huge racket and commotion every time she gets up. I had an in-house session with my trainer where we observed the barking and she told me she was shocked he could hold himself in a stay while that was going on. It's really stressful having him leap up with his tail stiff at attention all the time when I stand up.

The whole way they interact and his predictable and unpredictable behaviours make daily life really difficult sometimes. For instance, I can't answer the door to sign for a package because she is a barker and I can't go near the back door to put her in the garden without setting off his door behaviour. He's way more interested in that than the delivery person at the door.

selzer:

Lots of good points. The garage is out for a kennel because it's uninsulated and way too hot in the summer. The basement might work, but the entrance is completely open and he can hear everything going on in the house at all times. Outside would be a disaster because of my neighbour's unsupervised dogs. I'm still trying to think about whether there's any way I can afford a wooden fence at the back so we could at least use the garden in peace.

He's not always badly behaved in the crate. For the most part he is okay with just sleeping in there. If he thinks the back door might be opening, he loses his mind. He also doesn't like being left in the crate when I leave. He doesn't do any self-destructive behaviour other than when he's attempting to get out by digging at the bottom and trying to force open the door.

I agree he needs structured routine and movement at home. I did have him leashed to me for multiple months, but that gradually fell by the wayside until I realized his behaviour was getting worse again. I am trying to get back to a routine similar to what you suggested with enforced down stays while I'm working. I have always and will continue to do NILIF for everything at home.

Steve:

The door thing has been ongoing for many months (you can see my previous thread). We were doing several daily training and desensitization sessions every day for weeks and weeks, and I finally got him to the point where I could at least let the two of them out together while holding him on a leash. There is no chance he will hold a down stay while I let her out right now, but he'll often do it when I let her in. I don't really know how to take it further and get him to stop obsessing over going out through that door. It's not a typical trigger I can work at his threshold or just have him completely avoid because it's a main feature of the main room of the house.
07-12-2014 03:17 PM
Zeeva
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Strom View Post
The cheap cyclone fencing type kennels from Home Depot come unraveled from the bottom just by pushing on them. The Doc Bobs are welded wire. They can rust and break over time, but they hold up with a little cleaning and maybe some spray paint.
I see. I take back my crate suggestion C:
07-12-2014 03:15 PM
selzer I have not had a dog chew on itself, but I have seen dogs that have. I did have a dog that could have killed herself demolishing any kind of crate. She broke a tooth on it, and a couple of times broke them and squeezed out -- dogs have gotten killed that way.

There are some dogs that do not do well when crated. My girl was ok if I was home, but if I tried to crate her when I wasn't home, she would do anything to get herself out of there. She was fine kenneled.

This dog has broken out of a crate, but I don't know that the dog actually has some sort of claustraphobic-separation instability that my girl may have had. I think it would be helpful though.
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