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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-28-2014 06:35 PM
Mac's Mom Sad. But the worst part is when the puppy is up for adoption next time, he'll be a larger untrained dog...harder to find a home
05-28-2014 06:31 PM
Pax8
Quote:
Originally Posted by jafo220 View Post
I would have told them if they don't have time for basic puppy training, then maybe a dog is the wrong thing to get. Then walk them over to the gold fish tank and hand them some gold fish and some supplies. Then tell them "There, this won't involve training, peeing or chewing things up."
Some people can't even do that...another woman refused to buy a filtered tank for her goldfish because she thought filters looked ugly. So she would stick them in glass bowls until they poisoned themselves with their own nitrates and then just throw them out and buy a new round. When we found out what she was doing, we blacklisted her from buying live animals, but I think she went through a couple rounds of fish before we caught what was going on.

And I know the workers at our store shelter try their best to steer people towards appropriate dogs. They're not allowed to tell anyone "no" unless they have reason to believe the dog is going to be put in a directly harmful situation (like a bait dog) but they will suggest the easiest going, low requirement dog to talk about to say, a new dog owner about. And they always call me or one of the other trainers when potential adopters have any questions.

A friend of mine who worked there was fired for refusing to adopt out a German Shepherd with dog aggression issues to a girl who had never had a dog before, but thought the shepherd was "pretty". My friend was fired and the dog was adopted to the girl. When the girl realized she was in over her head, she slapped a cheap shock collar on it and shocked the crap out of it anytime it even looked at another dog. Now it's the worst bundle of anxiety and fear I think I've ever seen in my life.

It's times like that when I start to question if maybe the needle isn't the worst thing for some of these dogs...
05-28-2014 06:18 PM
JoeyG I really wish people would put more effort into matching dogs with people. I volunteer with a gsd rescue who does screen and do everything they can and people swear up and down they're active and can take a high energy dog. A week or two later they're calling about returning them because its more then they can handle... its so sad to see

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05-27-2014 06:13 PM
jafo220
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pax8 View Post
So two people yesterday were adopting 3 month old GSD mix puppies from the adoption center in the store. Both were buying $100-150 worth of starting supplies. But they had very different comments after seeing their totals.

Adopter 1: "Oh good, I still have enough to sign up for the training class this week."

Adopter 2: "Jeez, I hope it doesn't pee on my carpet. Do you know how to get it to stop chewing things? And to walk on a leash?"
Me: "Well, you could take it to a training class to teach it basic manners."
Adopter 2: "I really don't have time for that. Is there a zappy collar I can put on it to make it stop without getting up?"

There are two types of people...
I would have told them if they don't have time for basic puppy training, then maybe a dog is the wrong thing to get. Then walk them over to the gold fish tank and hand them some gold fish and some supplies. Then tell them "There, this won't involve training, peeing or chewing things up."
05-27-2014 05:41 PM
onyx'girl they may as well just sell them in bunches to research facilities.....no kill can mean that as well
05-27-2014 02:01 PM
Magwart
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx'girl View Post
Why aren't the adopters screened better?
Jane, among some high-kill public shelters, there is movement starting toward "open adoption" policies. I loathe it and fight hard against it locally, but it's the trend. Expect to see more and more about it--it's spreading through "consultants.".

As far as I can tell, it's advocated for by certain no-kill advocates who "consult" with shelter management on how to reduce euthanasia rates. The dogs are just numbers to move, not individuals with needs and personalities to be matched with homes and people.

Breed seems to be irrelevant in that world view (GSDs, Mals, Pitts, Rotts, Dobies, and Mastiffs get no more screening than Pugs) -- indeed, if you claim homes should be more carefully screened for "powerful" breeds, you will likely be labeled a "breedist." (These people apparently mean this to be an insult. They don't realize how moronic it sounds when said to a BREED rescuer....)

Here's what I think is really going on: I think some shelters in dire circumstances have simply given up on even trying to screen because they don't have the resources. The "open adoption" philosophy is wrapped up in a no-kill rhetoric and reducing euthanasia rates, so it sounds warm and fuzzy. It lets the shelter claim that it's "doing something" to improve the euthanasia rate, without taking responsibility for how badly things may turn out for some of the dogs. In my opinion, it's a convenient post-hoc justification for an already-existing failure to dedicate resources to thoughtful adoption screening and matches in these underfunded public shelters.

It gets worse. One of these "consultants" wanted to get private rescues (including breed rescues) to commit to an "open adoptions" program, including mass adoption events in parking lots where anyone who wants a dog can walk up and pay $12 and leave with a dog, with little paperwork or screening (and absolutely no home check or vet reference check). The idea is if rescues are churning dog adoptions (and flipping dogs quickly), they'll pull more dogs from the public shelter, driving down euthanasia rates. Remember, the dogs are just numbers to move.

Advocates of this philosophy claim that their random-chance adoptions produce no worse results than the careful screening typically done by breed rescues. I don't buy it, but I'm not going to put dogs at risk to test it out.
05-27-2014 11:36 AM
Pax8
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx'girl View Post
Why aren't the adopters screened better? They should have a 4 or 6 week mandatory class included in the adoption fee(to train the owners!)
Setting the pups up to fail from the get go is sad. Rescue or 'adoption center' should be more responsible in placements. Though I know people will just go to CL or elsewhere if they are set on getting a pup.
The group renting the space is the city animal shelter. So there's really not much screening process beyond can they afford the fee. It's not the best either way. I know some people are adopting dogs they shouldn't be getting, but the city shelter is also a fairly high-kill one.

Ugh, and the city is even planning on making huge cutbacks in the shelter's budget.

Glad I'm moving to another store...
05-27-2014 09:38 AM
Sarah~ Ugh, that would drive me crazy and depress me. So many dogs in shelters for those silly reasons that you just have to put a little effort into.
05-27-2014 09:35 AM
onyx'girl Why aren't the adopters screened better? They should have a 4 or 6 week mandatory class included in the adoption fee(to train the owners!)
Setting the pups up to fail from the get go is sad. Rescue or 'adoption center' should be more responsible in placements. Though I know people will just go to CL or elsewhere if they are set on getting a pup.
05-27-2014 09:27 AM
Kayos and Havoc Wow. I feel sorry for the pups.
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