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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-08-2014 04:50 PM
Liz&Anna
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Strom View Post
A lot of times at 5mos or so, they start looking at things a little different. Suspicion kicks in and some of the time she probably isn't real sure how to deal with it. I think generally, the more indifferent you can be, the easier it is for her to settle down until she grows out of it.
Agreed! usually zero reaction is better I wouldn't try to correct, it may just agitate , just be confident


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05-08-2014 04:46 PM
Steve Strom A lot of times at 5mos or so, they start looking at things a little different. Suspicion kicks in and some of the time she probably isn't real sure how to deal with it. I think generally, the more indifferent you can be, the easier it is for her to settle down until she grows out of it.
05-08-2014 04:42 PM
Liz&Anna
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twyla View Post
There may be a few 5 1/2 - 6 mth old puppies who have matured enough to reliably read human body language and understand intent, but it is safer for the pup and owner to assume that at this age, the pup is relying on the owner for direction and/or reacting out of fear.
Dogs read body language from DAY ONE show me a puppy that doesn't quickly pick up hand signals? Or a puppy who has slipped out the door that you have to catch and doesn't know your coming for them? A dog- even a puppy can read you and knows you better then you know your self, that is extremely untrue


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05-08-2014 04:33 PM
Twyla
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liz&Anna View Post
Hmm... If its a person that YOU are not comfortable with then I would say its ok for the dog to growl...at a creepy person on a darkened street corner living in the city and walking at night- alone??? The. What is the problem? If you alone I wouldn't even bother with "oh she's friendly" like said previously in this thread dogs ready body language QUITE WELL and it might not be your body language that your dog is not ok with...it could be the person you are approaching. Work on your basic obedience, make sure your dog know is you say "leave it" that there is no need to worry or to take matters in to its own hands. after all they are guard dogs. My dog is allot like yours, but I also try very hard to have full control of her.


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There may be a few 5 1/2 - 6 mth old puppies who have matured enough to reliably read human body language and understand intent, but it is safer for the pup and owner to assume that at this age, the pup is relying on the owner for direction and/or reacting out of fear.
05-08-2014 04:29 PM
Liz&Anna
Quote:
Originally Posted by megansha View Post
Thank you Liz&Anna, that's kind of what I was getting at without trying to be rude! She knows "leave it" great, both when she picks up something or when she tries to approach a dog/cat/human/bird etc. that I don't want her to.
Work on leave it on leash, with people have a friend help you, I would have the friend look "fun" and teach your pup you are more fun, you work up to high distractions, that way in a time of need you will have the behavior you ask, with Anna of it is a totally normal person she does the same- doesn't care won't even look at them will sit calmly or pets, but if it is someone who gives very direct eye contact or is OVERLY friendly she will bark (my girl is a big talker, she's not mean at all but she barks and it scares people) when approaching a person (just to avoid her jumping up and scratching them ) she has a "with me" command to basically come close (not quite a heel) but so that we are not taking up the entire side walk and the person can get by, you wouldn't believe how many people will show discomfort towards her (this is with her innocently passing by, no barking no nothing) just because she is a GSD I notice allot of people are cautious they will jerk there hands up away or step back....and I'm like really???? Way to make yourself look like a prey item... Any who, you coil be passing by people who are having small reactions like this to your dog and they read it. She is young and as she grows more confident she will learn there is no need to protect unless asked for. Just do your very best to walk confidently with her, walk her at your side not out in front so that she knows you are leading (not the other way around) sometimes people here can be a bit mean or quit to react and sometimes you will get fantastic advice and you will find out your not alone.


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05-08-2014 04:07 PM
selzer Take a self-defense class. Put some OFF! or mace in your pocket. Don't walk around like a victim wannabe.

Sorry, I know I shouldn't be blaming victims. But there are victims, and there are survivors of crime. And survivors are often victims until they wake up one day and say, NO MORE! They own their own power, they park under the streetlight, they keep their keys in their hand, and they walk confidently.

It is odd, but they showed a clip of people walking in a city to a bunch of different inmates of a prison. They all chose the same people to victimize. It does not have to do with size, weight, body type. There are people out there that walk like victims.

What you are doing by going to places that make you feel insecure, is that you are over-riding your common sense and putting yourself into dangerous situations. The first thing you will learn in a self-defense course is not to be there. Don't put yourself in a position where you are likely to be victimized.

Right now that five month old pup can't help you. If you are attacked that dog will be ripped out of your hands and swung up against a wall or over a fence or kicked to death. They cannot protect you. Not at all. Not at that age. The only thing they can do is make noise, and hearing a puppy barking is unlikely to bring the neighborhood to your rescue. Not in crappy neighborhoods.

So if you have to drive to somewhere more populated, or some quaint country village well out of town, then do so to protect yourself and your puppy. In the mean time, go out and get into some real self-defense courses. Don't let yourself become a statistic.

ETA: The most important thing. Walking your dog when you feel insecure will make your dog feel insecure and it will teach your dog that people are scary. The dog will not look insecure, most likely he will look intimidating, barking and growling. And, unfortunately, these dogs are the ones that are likely to bite an old lady with a walker, or a little kid that runs up behind. Please do not teach your dog to be insecure around people. Please don't let your dog become a statistic either.
05-08-2014 03:55 PM
megansha Thank you Liz&Anna, that's kind of what I was getting at without trying to be rude! She knows "leave it" great, both when she picks up something or when she tries to approach a dog/cat/human/bird etc. that I don't want her to.
05-08-2014 03:53 PM
Liz&Anna Hmm... If its a person that YOU are not comfortable with then I would say its ok for the dog to growl...at a creepy person on a darkened street corner living in the city and walking at night- alone??? The. What is the problem? If you alone I wouldn't even bother with "oh she's friendly" like said previously in this thread dogs ready body language QUITE WELL and it might not be your body language that your dog is not ok with...it could be the person you are approaching. Work on your basic obedience, make sure your dog know is you say "leave it" that there is no need to worry or to take matters in to its own hands. after all they are guard dogs. My dog is allot like yours, but I also try very hard to have full control of her.


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05-08-2014 03:36 PM
megansha We walk after dark when I get off work as there is no way to avoid it, I live in the city and truth be told I'm sometimes uncomfortable doing so as a young woman. I don't know how my behavior changes when I see unfamiliar people in the neighborhood, but I'll try to be more aware from now on.
05-08-2014 03:18 PM
Sunflowers You don't want to call it fear, okay, let's call it anxiety or discomfort. These dogs are very sensitive and your emotions are traveling straight down the leash to her. They pick up on so much more than we think they do.
Exactly what is this behavior of yours that she's picking up on?
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