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Thread: "Bad" mixes? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-30-2014 03:17 PM
blackshep I know someone who got a dog for flyball, that was 3/4 Dutchie x 1/4 English Mastiff????

First off it was WAY too big, secondly, the Mastiff in her totally killed the drive, it was just the most mellow dog that had no motivation to go very fast in any direction. lol

I mean...I can at least wrap my head around a GSD x Mali mix, two high drive, serious dogs of relatively similar size and type, but the Dutchie x Mastiff made no sense in any way shape or form. And the people were really surprised the dog didn't work out for flyball (although she was as sweet as can be)
04-30-2014 01:55 PM
Freestep
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubyTuesday View Post
That surprises me. The ones I've seen have had much more normal looking jaws & facial structures 'tho I didn't closely examine their teeth.
The ones I have seen usually have gross underbites and malocclusions. It seems that when you breed a brachycephalic breed with a normal breed, the upper and lower jaws grow at vastly different rates, and the jaws do not line up properly at maturity. At least with a Pug, you know you'll be dealing with dental problems, breathing problems, etc. But if you get one of these "designer" breeds like Puggles (Pug x Beagle) thinking that you can avoid such problems, you've been duped.

I will say that most of them do breathe a little easier since the nasal passages are not as cramped.
04-30-2014 09:52 AM
dawnandjr There was a link to a study posted on FB recently that talked about mixes no longer are healthier than purebreds. Lots of mixes end up with HD/ED. If one or both parents have it, pups can have it. Mixes are not usually health tested or titled (the exception being the competion bred mixes). Reputable breeders take the time to research their dogs linage and try to match character traits that suite eachother, compliment eachother and have the best chance for a good outcome of the breeding pair. Dominant traits will show the majority of the time. Getting a purebred can increase the chances of knowing what your product of the parents will be.

Actually fostering a litter of pups will show you how pups within the same litter can be so different. It will help you to figure out which character traits are important to you when searching for your own purebred pup.
04-30-2014 08:34 AM
Maeuselchen Hasenherz
Quote:
The problem is, the majority of purebreds simply aren't well bred from dependent, proven, tested stock. The majority of german shepherds on this forum don't seem like the best bred. Let alone those out in the world.
This.
The most so called "purebred " dogs are actually not bred with the breeding standarts of one of the breeding clubs or they even found clubs just to breed with phaenotypic "GSD-like" dogs that either don't have the respective papers or can't breed in the clubs because they don't have ability, requierements or the money to do the respective tests so that they are allowed to breed.
Just a very small amount of dogs in contrary to the whole dog population, at least here in Germany, are actually bred in a member club of the FCI. The most are "OOps"-bred or "Oops, we did it again every six months"-bred, and these are dogs without the "breeder" spending much thought on which sire they should take, learning about genetics and/or genetic diseases or caring about finding a dog with the right temperament so that it is actually worth breeding.
I suppose that these dogs make a big part of the so called "sick purebreds".

A mix can be healthy or sick as well as a purebred, but the chance to get a healthy dog with a relativey sound temperament by picking a well tested and a careful bred dog from a good breeder is probably higher than sticking to a mix of two or more breeds of dog, that all come with their genetic "backpack" and that are not tested.
Mixes, especially puppies, can be like a kinder surprise egg.
Sweet and cute on the outsite, but you don't know what they've got in them.
I've got a "street mix" here probably loads of different breeds in it...it still got severe HD and a dog with this kind of temperament (fearful but relatively dominent, with a tendency to act forward) really shouldn't be bred, since he could have ended up very dangerous in the wrong hands.
He'll probably not gonna get old.


The myth that mixes are more healthy than purebred.
I think it's more a unbased theory than actually the truth, because
a) not all the dogs that are said to be purebred are really well bred and/or even pure
b) purebred dogs and their ancestors have more health checks, so even "diseases" that they don't really show and they can live with without impairment (f.e. light HD) when cared for the right way by their owners, get documented. The most Mixes would go with these genetic diseases without being noticed because they don't get these checks.
04-29-2014 03:49 PM
Anubis_Star The problem is, the majority of purebreds simply aren't well bred from dependent, proven, tested stock. The majority of german shepherds on this forum don't seem like the best bred. Let alone those out in the world.

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04-29-2014 03:48 PM
Anubis_Star
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubyTuesday View Post
I strongly favor healthy, long lived pb dogs, but on average the truly random bred dogs (real mutts, NOT designer crosses) are healthier, sounder & live longer. Many years back there was an extensive study on this which Dog World (to their credit) covered. I can live with the truth of that & consider it a fair trade off for predictability regarding temperament, conformation, genetic obedience etc. I can't abide the breeders who pay no more than scant lip service to health, longevity, temperament & structural soundness. Unfortunately the evidence of that is all around us. Sadly, our beloved GSDs aren't exempt from the ghastly morass pb breeding has all too often devolved into.
I'm going to have to disagree with this because I've just seen the problems first hand. Arthritis and dysplasia and allergies and skin issues.

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04-29-2014 02:52 PM
LaRen616
Quote:
Originally Posted by Courtney View Post
I understand when you say true mutts - not these designer crosses. Someone at work told me the other day they know someone with a Shepadoddle - good grief.

Anyways - growing up we always had good old fashion mutts. I remember my country area having strays. But in all honesty these dogs lived 13 + years with no health issues - I won't even tell you what they were fed .

Last year my dad lost his boy at 17 - the little guy showed up under his truck during a thunderstorm. What kind of mutt - no idea. But he was an average size dog.

Because I was getting a purebred dog I was more worried about health issues to be honest.
I agree with you.

My mom's GSD/Husky mix was just 4 months shy of turning 15 years old. She was healthy up until her last couple of months and she was fed whatever was on sale at the time. We had a Lhaso Apso/Cocker Spaniel/Poodle mix that made it to almost 16 years old before we had to put him to sleep. My aunt had a Doberman/Keeshond mix that was very healthy and she passed away at almost 15 years of age.

I think mixes tend to live longer than purebreds.
04-29-2014 02:42 PM
Courtney
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubyTuesday View Post
I strongly favor healthy, long lived pb dogs, but on average the truly random bred dogs (real mutts, NOT designer crosses) are healthier, sounder & live longer. Many years back there was an extensive study on this which Dog World (to their credit) covered. I can live with the truth of that & consider it a fair trade off for predictability regarding temperament, conformation, genetic obedience etc. I can't abide the breeders who pay no more than scant lip service to health, longevity, temperament & structural soundness. Unfortunately the evidence of that is all around us. Sadly, our beloved GSDs aren't exempt from the ghastly morass pb breeding has all too often devolved into.
I understand when you say true mutts - not these designer crosses. Someone at work told me the other day they know someone with a Shepadoddle - good grief.

Anyways - growing up we always had good old fashion mutts. I remember my country area having strays. But in all honesty these dogs lived 13 + years with no health issues - I won't even tell you what they were fed .

Last year my dad lost his boy at 17 - the little guy showed up under his truck during a thunderstorm. What kind of mutt - no idea. But he was an average size dog.

Because I was getting a purebred dog I was more worried about health issues to be honest.
04-29-2014 02:36 PM
RubyTuesday [quote]And anytime I've seen a brachycephalic breed mixed with a normal-faced breed (like Pug x Beagle) in some misguided attempt to "improve" the brachycephalic breed, has been disastrous. Horrible bite and dental problems.[quote]That surprises me. The ones I've seen have had much more normal looking jaws & facial structures 'tho I didn't closely examine their teeth. They looked much like the older styled breeds where the faces were short but NOT non-existent. (Things have gone obscenely awry when a dog injures its eyeballs if it bumps head on into a wall).
04-29-2014 02:31 PM
RubyTuesday
Quote:
The HEALTHIEST dogs are going to be well bred purebreds from health tested parents. Hands down. If you want the best guarantee at a healthy dog, you need to go the route.
I strongly favor healthy, long lived pb dogs, but on average the truly random bred dogs (real mutts, NOT designer crosses) are healthier, sounder & live longer. Many years back there was an extensive study on this which Dog World (to their credit) covered. I can live with the truth of that & consider it a fair trade off for predictability regarding temperament, conformation, genetic obedience etc. I can't abide the breeders who pay no more than scant lip service to health, longevity, temperament & structural soundness. Unfortunately the evidence of that is all around us. Sadly, our beloved GSDs aren't exempt from the ghastly morass pb breeding has all too often devolved into.
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