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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-12-2014 07:20 PM
LifeofRiley
Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
Before Katrina, heartworm was not wide spread in this area. The way that problem works is that the mosquito must become infected by biting an infected dog, and then it matures with in the mosquito, and is deposited in another dog. So if all those infected dogs were not brought up this way, we wouldn't be having as much of a problem here. The mosquitos themselves do not bring the problem, it is transmitted from infected dogs. This is a huge problem with relocating pets from outside the area to an area. And they didn't bother to treat them before they got them here.
Hi Selzer,

It really is not that simple. Heartworm has long been present in the Midwest.

And, there are a number of factors that influence heartworm infection rates in any given region year-to-year. They include:
  • Size and distribution of mosquito populations that are capable of transmitting the disease in any given year
  • Spread of mosquito populations to new habitats due to environmental factors (natural and human made).
  • Municipal/regional mosquito control practices
  • Socio-economic factors that influence the likelihood of any given owner population to comply with screening tests and use of heartworm preventatives
  • Timely screening and treatment of infected dogs by owners
  • Strong animal sheltering procedures that include screening and treatment of animals infected with heartworm
  • Infection rates in regional wildlife populations – primarily coyotes.
  • Mobility of humans and dogs (people moving with untreated dogs and the movement of dogs from high-incidence areas without timely treatment upon arrival in shelter/rescue)
My dog was pulled from a rural shelter in downstate Illinois. He arrived in rescue HW+. He was promptly treated.
05-12-2014 12:17 AM
selzer
Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeofRiley View Post
From my perspective, the biggest costs rescues are facing when bringing dogs up from the South is treatment for Heartworm.

I truly hope that the anti-vaccination - anti-veterinarian advice - crowd recognizes how serious of a problem this is to those who deal with the dogs who have been cast aside.

Of course, I recognize that most of the problem is due to people who are clueless as to what it means to own a dog, but I do feel that some of what I have heard on here is also not helping the situation.
Before Katrina, heartworm was not wide spread in this area. The way that problem works is that the mosquito must become infected by biting an infected dog, and then it matures with in the mosquito, and is deposited in another dog. So if all those infected dogs were not brought up this way, we wouldn't be having as much of a problem here. The mosquitos themselves do not bring the problem, it is transmitted from infected dogs. This is a huge problem with relocating pets from outside the area to an area. And they didn't bother to treat them before they got them here.
05-11-2014 05:47 PM
LifeofRiley Hi folks,

Sorry for subjecting this thread to yet another tangent last night. Let me explain my train of thought re: the anti-vaccination theme and how it was relevant to earlier discussion.

I was thinking about Vandal’s comment about how the marketing efforts of pet stores promote the idea of pets being vital members of the family, i.e. “furkids.” Her comment made it seem like this was a really bad thing. I was thinking that -by and large - I don’t see it as a bad thing… from my perspective, if that mindset drives more active engagement with pets and sensitivity to their needs, how can that be wrong? And, then I thought about people who have decided not to vaccinate their children because they have bought into some pseudo-science on the issue. So, I thought, hmmm… maybe there are some areas where the “furkids” mindset has become problematic.

The issue of vaccination of human children is all the more meaningful to me because I know that children in the developing world die everyday because they do not have access to the life-saving vaccines people here so willingly take for granted. I have been at the rural clinics in those parts of the world, I have seen the lack of access and its consequences first hand.
05-11-2014 12:56 AM
LifeofRiley From my perspective, the biggest costs rescues are facing when bringing dogs up from the South is treatment for Heartworm.

I truly hope that the anti-vaccination - anti-veterinarian advice - crowd recognizes how serious of a problem this is to those who deal with the dogs who have been cast aside.

Of course, I recognize that most of the problem is due to people who are clueless as to what it means to own a dog, but I do feel that some of what I have heard on here is also not helping the situation.
05-10-2014 11:41 PM
angelas
Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
I don't think this was aimed at me, but I am going to take a stab at it anyway. I am fine with shelter pets. No problem. But I don't like the trend toward making people who get a dog from a breeder feel guilty. Purchasing a dog from a shelter or a rescue or a breeder does not make one a better person. People should not feel their dog is less because it comes from a shelter or rescue, and people should not feel guilty for buying one from a breeder.
Amen, I had a Purina peddler at Petsmart try this on me on Sunday. After he told me how many times there are so many dogs in shelters locally (despite all the ones in the store being imports from Calif) I finally asked him where I could find one who's parents/family were completely health tested and had proven stable temperaments because I've already had two wild-card dogs and this time I was going to stack the deck in my favor*.

*not that I wouldn't have taken the little brindle pitty that attacked me with her tongue in a hot second
05-10-2014 11:34 PM
angelas
Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeofRiley View Post

Canine brucellosis is transmitted during breeding. Most shelters have a spay/neuter requirement prior to adoption. In Chicago, all will spay/neuter prior to adoption. So, not sure how you can blame the spread of that disease on communities that have stronger regulations on shelters.

If you are truly worried about the re-emergence of disease, you may want to focus your attention on the counties that have lax animal sheltering laws and the anti-vaccination fanatics that seem to have grown in numbers lately.
Not always the case re: transmission. From The Center for Food Security and Public Health:

Quote:
In dogs, B. canis primarily enters the body by ingestion and through the genital, oronasal and conjunctival mucosa, but transmission through broken skin may also be possible. Most cases are thought to be acquired by venereal transmission or by contact with the fetus and fetal membranes after abortions and stillbirths. Puppies can be infected in utero, and may remain persistently infected even if they appear normal.
Nursing puppies can be infected from milk, but the importance of this route is controversial. Other potential sources of infection include blood transfusions and contaminated syringes.
B. canis can be spread on fomites. In conditions of high humidity, low temperatures and no sunlight, Brucellaspp. can remain viable for several months in water, aborted fetuses, feces, equipment and clothing.
Brucella species can withstand drying, particularly when organic material is present, and can survive in dust and soil.

Survival is longer when the temperature is low, particularly when it is below freezing.



So even a dog not used for breeding can transmit on contract this disease.

As far as transporting shelter dogs out of their area of origin I'm fine with that as long as they are quarantined and health tested for diseases that are not present in the destination area (like heartworm, lyme disease, brucellosis etc) and have a permanent, approved home waiting for them. However, there is no reason for a dog to be moved just to languish in rescue and take up space that could have been used for a local dog.

05-10-2014 11:32 PM
selzer
Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeofRiley View Post
Well, PetSmart and Petco do not generate billions in income per year. But, I suspect you are talking about the marketing efforts of the commercial pet industry that includes pet supply stores, dog/cat food manufacturers, pet health care, etc.

I will argue that the inclusion of shelter pets into many of these campaigns did not happen arbitrarily. It was designed to support the efforts of animal welfare groups to raise awareness of adoptable dogs at shelters.

Even with that said, the organizations that have spent the most time, money and effort in sending a very directed national message about shelter pets have not been the for-profit arms of these companies.

Note: the not-for-profit entities of PetSmart and Petco have done a lot of good at the local level. In Chicago, they have been really great partners to local animal rescues.

I, personally, think it is good that shelter pets have gained recognition over the years. And, I am uncertain as to why you think that is such a bad thing.
I don't think this was aimed at me, but I am going to take a stab at it anyway. I am fine with shelter pets. No problem. But I don't like the trend toward making people who get a dog from a breeder feel guilty. Purchasing a dog from a shelter or a rescue or a breeder does not make one a better person. People should not feel their dog is less because it comes from a shelter or rescue, and people should not feel guilty for buying one from a breeder.
05-10-2014 11:18 PM
LifeofRiley
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vandal View Post
Just for the record, Petco and Petsmart make BILLIONS of dollars per year.
Well, PetSmart and Petco do not generate billions in income per year. But, I suspect you are talking about the marketing efforts of the commercial pet industry that includes pet supply stores, dog/cat food manufacturers, pet health care, etc.

I will argue that the inclusion of shelter pets into many of these campaigns did not happen arbitrarily. It was designed to support the efforts of animal welfare groups to raise awareness of adoptable dogs at shelters.

Even with that said, the organizations that have spent the most time, money and effort in sending a very directed national message about shelter pets have not been the for-profit arms of these companies.

Note: the not-for-profit entities of PetSmart and Petco have done a lot of good at the local level. In Chicago, they have been really great partners to local animal rescues.

I, personally, think it is good that shelter pets have gained recognition over the years. And, I am uncertain as to why you think that is such a bad thing.
05-10-2014 11:14 PM
selzer There is no vaccination for brucellosis. And, not every shelter up here requires the spay/neuter thing. At least not until the dog is actually adopted. While it is fostered, it may not be altered.

But the problem is, altering a dog with brucellosis does not eliminate the problem, and yes, this disease is considered to be a breeding disease, because breeding animals will become sterile if infected, and pups will miscarry or be born very weak. But it can be transmitted through the urine, etc. It is a zoonotic disease.

It used to be that infected dogs were euthanized. But now they are not. But just altering them does not necessarily take care of the problems.
05-10-2014 10:51 PM
LifeofRiley
Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
As for spay/neuter, that campaign has worked maybe too well....

Up here in the north, we pretty much eliminated brucellosis and some other diseases, but when Katrina hit, all kinds of dogs from the south made their way up here and we have seen increases in many dreaded diseases.
While great strides have been made, national shelter statistics do not support your story. I, personally, think that the transporting of adoptable animals from low-adoption areas to high-adoption areas is a really good thing. I have participated in that effort alongside some of the most reputable rescues and non-profits in the city.

Canine brucellosis is transmitted during breeding. Most shelters have a spay/neuter requirement prior to adoption. In Chicago, all will spay/neuter prior to adoption. So, not sure how you can blame the spread of that disease on communities that have stronger regulations on shelters.

If you are truly worried about the re-emergence of disease, you may want to focus your attention on the counties that have lax animal sheltering laws and the anti-vaccination fanatics that seem to have grown in numbers lately.
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