German Shepherd Dog Forums - Reply to Topic

Increase font size: 0, 10, 25, 50%

GermanShepherds.com is the premier German Shepherd Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Thread: generic question about personal space and biting Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Trackback
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces):
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
03-03-2014 09:57 PM
brembo Re-visiting this a bit here.

I have been keeping tabs on myself with my dogs since I posted in this thread and have learned something. I do in fact interact with my dogs in a face-to-face way very very often. It's so ingrained in my personality/day to day that i didn't really consider that I do in fact "get up in my dog's faces".

When I come home I drop to a knee and hug/pat/rub the dogs as they go through the normal greeting spaz-out. Both dogs moan and whine and yip and nose bump my face/head with extreme regularity. I often lean over and allow them to come over and rub heads. At bedtime both usually give me a final once over and a night-night lick on the face. I get random drive-by lickings if I am down at dog head height as well. So, I have to say that I do in fact get lots of doggie facetime. It's so much a part of how my dogs communicate that I didn't realize just how much it happens.
03-01-2014 09:48 AM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Winners View Post
Interesting dog bite data from The Genius of dogs.

"70 percent of bites happen to children under the age of ten. More than 60 percent of the children bitten are boys, and 87 percent are white. Children are most frequently bitten (61 percent of the time) when they come in contact with the dog’s food or possessions."
And these numbers make it more then evident that children and dogs need to be taught. I like living in a house that I'm not on edge in.
03-01-2014 06:30 AM
MadLab I think a main point with dogs and personal space is for children and adults to act in such a way as to avoid a dog feeling like it needs to snap at them to give it space.

Any situation should be gauged depending on the temperament of the dog and how the children behave.

I've seen children hug my dog and sometimes it is ok, but generally i will explain to them to not go hugging a dog which is lying down resting and to leave it alone.

You won't really see dogs hugging or putting there paws on other dogs unless play-fighting , dominating or humping. So maybe dogs see hugging in a different way from us humans.

I also ask children to lift their chin and look to the side of the dog when passing dogs so they don't get licked and so they are not making eye contact with the dog when passing or show any fear. Chin up and to the side is showing a dog you respect it and are not interested in it imo. There are some interesting theories from Martin mackenna a self proclaimed dread-locked dog whisperer in his youtube videos. A different and more basic approach. Similar theory with CM, no touch talk eye contact.

Again it is relative with the children and the dog. If a dog grows up with the children and sleeps in their rooms etc they are gonna have a different relationship than if they meet once a week or a month.
03-01-2014 02:59 AM
David Winners Interesting dog bite data from
The Genius of dogs. The Genius of dogs.

"70 percent of bites happen to children under the age of ten. More than 60 percent of the children bitten are boys, and 87 percent are white. Children are most frequently bitten (61 percent of the time) when they come in contact with the dog’s food or possessions."
02-28-2014 10:27 PM
David Winners Responses in BLUE


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunflowers View Post
Well, then, let's discuss the training we do.
I worked to train "give" and "leave it." I also worked on "bring."

Hans's favorite toy is his blue Wigzi ball. A K9 trainer who evaluated him said Hans would do anything for that ball. I keep that ball, he gets it when I give it to him, and he needs to do things to earn it. Either watch me, or sit, or down, he has to do something before he gets that ball. When he is penned, I take it away. That ball appears when I am around to interact with him.

He has growled a couple of times when I moved to take it out of his mouth. When that happened, I used the give command, and he gave it to me. Then, we did more obedience.

This is showing the dog that he doesn't have anything to worry about. He will get the ball back, through interaction with you.

We also use that ball to have him search. I close him up somewhere, I go hide it in the house, and then open the door and release him to find his toy. The reward is fetch with it.

We train patience when opening and closing doors, he is not allowed to rush outside. He knows the quiet command and stops barking when asked. He knows wait, come, stay, and stop. He knows "let me see" which I use to inspect his teeth, belly, or any place on his body I think needs to be checked (he has lots of skin problems.)

As far as food is concerned, he automatically sits when he sees me with the food bowl and looks into my eyes until I release him to eat.
There are several others, but that is the gist of what we do. Pet obedience.
I look forward to suggestions. I would like to do more with him.
It sounds like you have a good relationship. As for doing "more", I would find an activity that you both enjoy. I like nosework, but I am biased LOL. It is something you can do anywhere, in any weather, for any length of time.
02-28-2014 09:59 PM
David Winners Sorry for the late reply. I'm playing catch up. Been a busy couple of days / nights.

It is hard to say without seeing the dog before and after. Did the dog move to block the object after? Did the dog move to block you after? How was the dog with the person away from the ball?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilie View Post
Good information to chew on. So, let me take it one more step (and get free advice while I'm at it!).....

If you have a dog that has never showed any form of resource guarding. A dog who is normally friendly to everyone, doesn't have 'space' issues. But one day this dog decides he doesn't like a new individual. He shows this by ignoring him, not aggression. The handler is standing near the new person, playing fetch with a toy with said dog. The dog brings the toy to the handler and drops it, waiting for it to be thrown again. New person reaches down for toy (which is between the handlers feet) and dog 'tags' person, then sits and watches new person. (By tag I mean the dog didn't use it's teeth, but bumped him with his snout).

Just in your general opinion - would this be a space issue, or a resource issue, or could it be both? I understood the tag to be a warning. But I couldn't figure out what the warning was for. Was it for the toy, or was it for the handler, or was it for space? Could it be all three?
02-28-2014 08:06 PM
shepherdmom
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chip18 View Post
If it helps, I just tested both theories! Rocky has never been "mouth fed" so I grabbed a hot dog put it in my teeth and let him take. Yep, I got a dog with no problems and yep he thought it was pretty cool!

He looked around on the floor for a minuet and then looked up! Oh cool he thought and took the hotdog very gentle from me!

Added note...he has wobblers, sooo that made it a little exciting as he steadied his head to home in!
dang Chip you were not supposed to try that yourself. I'm going to pull those video's down. That's a great way to get hurt with an adult dog you haven't trained to do that!
02-28-2014 07:51 PM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunflowers View Post
This is exactly why I asked this, because I think the same way.

Maybe a new thread with just this question would be in order.
Quote:
Originally Posted by shepherdmom View Post
I would like to see the answers to this as well. And how people handle puppy growling vrs adult growling.
Done!
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum...ml#post5113306
02-28-2014 07:23 PM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Winners View Post
You don't need to address possessiveness in a dog if it isn't there. If the dog doesn't care in the first place, all the kissing, hugging, food stealing and toy taking isn't going to matter.
Quote:
Originally Posted by shepherdmom View Post
The dogs come to you... they learn good things come from being close to face.
If it helps, I just tested both theories! Rocky has never been "mouth fed" so I grabbed a hot dog put it in my teeth and let him take. Yep, I got a dog with no problems and yep he thought it was pretty cool!

He looked around on the floor for a minuet and then looked up! Oh cool he thought and took the hotdog very gentle from me!

Added note...he has wobblers, sooo that made it a little exciting as he steadied his head to home in!
02-28-2014 07:08 PM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsdsar View Post
Now for John Q. Public. This is where I start getting wishy washy. I, personally would not knowingly take a dog to a public place without being sure of their response. But, to be sure if their response, you have to take them. So I generally pick smaller events, or go in knowing that I may have to leave if it proves overwhelming to my dog.
Yep did that. My guy flat did not like people! Did not know if he had any past bad experiences but something was off. (low growl greeted out first guest I used a muzzle (fabric muzzle) and instituted a "No you can't touch way dog policy" after awhile no more muzzle, Still no touch for a bit more time. Then when I could read him and knew what he looked like when he was calm, I finally allowed people to touch him...no problem.

He learned what normal interactions look like. People safe dog, kid safe dog today..no dog parks for the record.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:54 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
PetGuide.com
Basset.net DobermanTalk.com GoldenRetrieverForum.com OurBeagleWorld.com
BoxerForums.com DogForums.com GoPitbull.com PoodleForum.com
BulldogBreeds.com FishForums.com HavaneseForum.com SpoiledMaltese.com
CatForum.com GermanShepherds.com Labradoodle-dogs.net YorkieForum.com
Chihuahua-People.com RetrieverBreeds.com