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Thread: picked out a puppy and might be questioning my self. HELP!! Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-07-2014 06:42 PM
selzer
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackshep View Post
I have a dog with a bad hip who also has a low threshold, and I can tell you, the hip is a lot easier to manage. Don't underestimate how much easier life can be with a dog who has solid nerves and a clear head.

Sorry, but I don't see that leaving your dog out in 100 degree weather is any better than locking them in a car on a hot day. My dog loves the cold (not -40 plus windchill cold though!), but really suffers the heat (mind you she's black, so it's likely worse). I keep her in the air conditioning in hot weather.

Anyway, I don't think being kenneled is the worst thing in the world, I just think you miss out on some of the GSD's best qualities when you keep them locked out of the house, and it's definitely not my personal preference.
A dog can survive a 100 degree day if it has a shady spot, and plenty of water. The temperatures in a car due to the greenhouse effect will boil a dog. It will kill the dog. There is a difference.

Not everyone has air conditioning, and being outside where there may be a breeze is much better than being inside where it is hot and miserable, and the body heat of the all the little furry critters is adding to it.

Ideally, the yard will be designed with a doggy door into a structure like a house, garage, basement, or outbuilding, where it is cooler during the heat of the day. Nothing cooler than the cement of the garage floor on a hot summer's day -- boy I miss having a garage.

Our dogs were not designed with AC considered into the plans. Their coats are supposed to protect them from summer and winter extremes. This won't win me any friends, but it is far better for a dog to be outside on a hot day, where he can lie under a shade tarp that lowers the outdoor temperature by 10 degrees or so, than it is to take a dog who is living in a central air 70 degree home, and take it out in 100 degree weather and walk around the block a few times. The kennel dog is acclimated to the temperature and can handle it better. With plenty of water and shade that he can move under if necessary he will be fine.

They're dogs. Their counterparts are out there in the environment 24/7. Their bodies are made for it. Their temperaments can be conditioned to be more or less tolerant of it.

The outdoor dog who roams freely in the yard are all day, or is connected to a chain, is likely to be covered in mud by the time the owner returns. Eventually the owner will avoid spending as much time with a dirty dog, and the dog will probably be neglected.
02-07-2014 10:53 AM
Blanketback It depends on where you live. Dogs get stolen, dogs get poisoned...this isn't fiction. I wish it was!
02-07-2014 10:33 AM
Lark
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack's Dad View Post
Lots of good info on this site but also lots of fear.

I had no idea of the fear level with regard to peoples dogs. Like all the horrible things that can happen to a dog in the yard or kennel.

I've had dogs for over 50 years and never had an incident from them being outside in a kennel or yard while I was at work. None of them were injured riding in a car without a restraint.

I disagree with gsdsar on one thing. I want the bully puppy, the one who knocks everything out of the way to come see you.

Good luck in your search.
This was a great post in my opinion. I for some reason have that fear, and I don't know why. My previous two dogs I was way more lax with and they had a dog door that went into the yard. They were in and out all day while I was at work and we never had a problem. But now I have become a nervous wreck and the dog is always monitored or crated. Too much lurking on the forum probably.
02-07-2014 10:08 AM
Blanketback The problem is, many of us have witnessed the sad existence that some dogs have. If we haven't seen it with our own eyes, then there's always the internet. I highly doubt the GSD owner who tied his dog to a tree for 4 years is a member of this forum...but if I can save even 1 GSD from that kind of cruelty, then I'm satisfied.

I agree with you dpc143 - people should look at their living conditions before choosing which breed to acquire. That's why I mentioned perhaps seeking one that sheds less, if that was such a great concern, since OP mentioned it.
02-07-2014 08:30 AM
dpc134
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Winners View Post
IMO, there is a huge difference between having a run outside for that dog where it can spend time, much as it would in a crate, and banishing the dog to the back yard.

Nowhere did I see that plan of action from the OP. How or why you would draw that assumption from someone who is carrying enough to reach out for help for her dog is beyond me.

To the OP:

Kudos for seeking help with your dog. Work hard, learn all you can and be consistent. Enjoy that puppy!

David Winners
David - this is a common prejudice among the general public that I see and hear quite often. Any dog that is outside is seen as "banished" and "isolated". Simply not true in most cases.

People really should look at the type of living situation they have for their dog(s), such as location (country vs city), breed (GSD vs toy dog), living arrangements (apartment vs 100 acres of woods). Huge differences. There are so many situations that I can speak about from people that I know who have inside dogs who rarely see the outside (only for bathroom breaks). They rarely experience what my dog does (running through the woods, swimming in ponds, rolling in mud, etc.). They have behavior problems, such as seperation anxiety (pacing back and forth in front of their sliding glass door), lack of energy, overwieght. But I don't think that all inside dogs are treated this way. That would be unfair.

To the OP, great job on seeking advice and help from others. I'm sure you will make a wonderful owner and your pup will be very happy wether inside or outside.
02-07-2014 08:15 AM
blackshep I have a dog with a bad hip who also has a low threshold, and I can tell you, the hip is a lot easier to manage. Don't underestimate how much easier life can be with a dog who has solid nerves and a clear head.

Sorry, but I don't see that leaving your dog out in 100 degree weather is any better than locking them in a car on a hot day. My dog loves the cold (not -40 plus windchill cold though!), but really suffers the heat (mind you she's black, so it's likely worse). I keep her in the air conditioning in hot weather.

Anyway, I don't think being kenneled is the worst thing in the world, I just think you miss out on some of the GSD's best qualities when you keep them locked out of the house, and it's definitely not my personal preference.
02-07-2014 04:19 AM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSDreamer View Post
he/she would live mostly in doors until a he/she would get a little older and start to shed more then move to the back yard in to a great dog house.
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Winners View Post
IMO, there is a huge difference between having a run outside for that dog where it can spend time, much as it would in a crate, and banishing the dog to the back yard.

Nowhere did I see that plan of action from the OP. How or why you would draw that assumption from someone who is carrying enough to reach out for help for her dog is beyond me.


David Winners
02-07-2014 04:05 AM
David Winners
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chip18 View Post
Thank you! I was wonder if someone else caught that!

Raise a dog in the home and then banish him to aquote "beautiful dog house" yeah that's a recipe for a great family pet! ...I'll stop now,
IMO, there is a huge difference between having a run outside for that dog where it can spend time, much as it would in a crate, and banishing the dog to the back yard.

Nowhere did I see that plan of action from the OP. How or why you would draw that assumption from someone who is carrying enough to reach out for help for her dog is beyond me.

To the OP:

Kudos for seeking help with your dog. Work hard, learn all you can and be consistent. Enjoy that puppy!

David Winners
02-07-2014 03:07 AM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakodaCD OA View Post
sue missed that, thanks

And I agree with Nix's mom's post above..

One thing I wanted to add, that I did see in your original post, you might reconsider moving a puppy/dog out to a dog house as it ages..GSD's like nothing better than being with their people, which includes living with their family. Yes they shed, but I'd rather crate inside than have my dogs outside. Just me
Thank you! I was wonder if someone else caught that!

Raise a dog in the home and then banish him to aquote "beautiful dog house" yeah that's a recipe for a great family pet! ...I'll stop now,
02-07-2014 02:53 AM
OriginalWacky
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Taggart View Post
Or, dear! What is better - to be in a mental hospital, or to be paralyzed down the waist? But it can be both.
Dogs don't have mental institutions. And many dogs are paralyzed and do just fine with it.

You're blathering misinformation (IE: Many owners by exposing their puppies to strangers simply teach their dogs to attack people) that is almost scary to see. I do agree that SOME of what forms how a dog reacts is about what the owners do (what you said: the main reason why dogs grow up as nice pets is the family itself.), BUT a shy, nervy dog is not going to just grow in a nice pet without some intervention that the general public may not be capable of without assistance. A dog that has a solid temperament bred into it is likely to be able to get past the mistakes we all make at one point or another.
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