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Thread: Over excited when people come over Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-14-2014 03:30 PM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blanketback View Post
Ok you guys, stop flirting and get back on topic. OP needs some help here. I suggest using hard corrections on the guests. If they can't . use some self control and ignore the pup, then go after them! Escort them to the door and tell them not to come back until they understand that this is very important.
Yep, Never got my guest under control..dog people. And for two of my dogs people,were the bestest, most wonderful treat ever!!!!!!!!!!!!!

[QUOTE=Blanketback;5021994
OP, get your pup to settle at your side with a nice knuckle bone to work on. Tether your pup to the furniture if you have to, but make sure that he stays there quietly. If he's acting up, crate him for 10 minutes and start over again. He'll eventually decide that he'd rather be with you. This worked for me. But you can't uncrate him until he's quiet. And you have to recrate him when he isn't. Every single time, so he gets it.[/QUOTE]Yep most likely what has to done... or live with it for the next 10 to 12 years?
02-14-2014 01:37 PM
Blanketback Ok you guys, stop flirting and get back on topic. OP needs some help here. I suggest using hard corrections on the guests. If they can't use some self control and ignore the pup, then go after them! Escort them to the door and tell them not to come back until they understand that this is very important.

OP, get your pup to settle at your side with a nice knuckle bone to work on. Tether your pup to the furniture if you have to, but make sure that he stays there quietly. If he's acting up, crate him for 10 minutes and start over again. He'll eventually decide that he'd rather be with you. This worked for me. But you can't uncrate him until he's quiet. And you have to recrate him when he isn't. Every single time, so he gets it.
02-14-2014 01:33 PM
DJEtzel
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baillif View Post
Are you serious?
Seriously arguing your method of training for every situation under the sun because I do not agree whatsoever? Yes.
02-14-2014 01:31 PM
Baillif Are you serious?
02-14-2014 01:23 PM
DJEtzel
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baillif View Post
Alright well i got nothing more to say. Youre obviously a superior trainer and its only a matter of time before we see you at worlds in all the ringsports and ipo kicking the crap out of the lazy trainers like Ivan Balabanov or michael ellis or anybody else putting prong collars and ecollars on their dogs. You should hold a seminar or something.
I'm not sure why you have an attitude. I told you that I use prong collars and shock collars and don't have a problem with them and understand that some sports need to use corrections to get desired results.

But for real life, going out with your dog or teaching them manners inside the house like this, it just isn't necessary. I am a decent trainer because I am willing to adapt tools for the situation. If they situation were IPO and ringsport, I'd be using a prong. When the situation is a poorly trained dog who's excited about guests coming over, I'm not. There are better methods in this case to achieve the same results.
02-14-2014 01:18 PM
Baillif Alright well i got nothing more to say. Youre obviously a superior trainer and its only a matter of time before we see you at worlds in all the ringsports and ipo kicking the crap out of the lazy trainers like Ivan Balabanov or michael ellis or anybody else putting prong collars and ecollars on their dogs. You should hold a seminar or something.
02-14-2014 12:36 PM
DJEtzel
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Taggart View Post
I'm just waiting for a good electric + charge by watching Canadians play. Do you like hockey, DJEtzel? Women play it too.
I've been a huge hockey fan since I was 5.
02-14-2014 12:35 PM
DJEtzel
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baillif View Post
Positive reinforcement works great until you run into a distracting competing motivator the dog cares about more. If you have a dog that cares about food or a tug more than anything else in the world then yes positive reinforcement and the negative punishment from withholding of it for non compliance works fine. The problem is when the dog isnt very food or toy motivated or there is a distraction the dog cares about more than your motivator and this is reality for most dogs out there. You could argue using the distraction itself as a motivator but this is only possible if you can sometimes let the dog access it. If your dog wants to kill cats more than anything else in the world the toy or tug wont stop him. You cant let him access the cat (or shouldnt) so what now?

What exactly is your definition of reliability anyway? If you cant safely walk a dog through a city with busy streets and have him heel off leash without e collar or prong or any means of control other than training then we aren't talking about the same level of reliability.
Then you have to go back to square one and find something you can use to motivate a dog. I have never met a dog whom I couldn't find a motivator for. Eventually there is something, and sure, if you're working on cat reactivity/aggression, you can't start with the cat and something that doesn't motivate the dog. You have to use the motivator to build a strong focus on you, then add in the cat while the dog is still under threshold. If the dog is going nuts and won't work for your motivator, then you need to change motivators or add distance. It's not something that happens over night, but it happens a whole lot more positively than it does with those seeking quick results.

My definition of reliability is the dog being reliable under any situation I take them into with commands that I have proofed on the dog. When I was a student there were plenty of times that I walked my (then) 2 y/o GSD Frag off leash to and from Western Michigan University's campus and home on a thin sidewalk next to a busy street - with students walking around, dogs being biked, etc. etc. and we stopped to play fetch on Western's lawn. Without ever trying to greet anyone or wander. My border collie and I go to a *sometimes* busy nature preserve to hike off leash and he's recalled to heel position every time we see someone (dog or human) where he is down stayed until the dog or human passes, then we continue walking freely. We're talking about the same level of reliability, I just don't achieve mine with Prongs and shock collars. My dogs want to work for me because we've built a solid foundation of them getting what they want when they listen to me and they enjoy working for me because I make it fun and reward them often. Not because I pull them around by a prong collar. I tried that to teach Frag to walk on a loose leash originally and what ended up working was silky lead training and the clicker.
02-13-2014 08:12 PM
Chip18 I can't imagine an out of control guest happy GSD myself? My guy goes gladly to his bed and stays there when company comes over!

Now my BullMastiff/Pit and my Boxer, they were people crazy! I could control them but "not" my guest!
02-13-2014 06:29 PM
David Winners
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bequavious View Post
Do your dogs have to lay down on the bed when you send them, or do they just have to have their feet on it? We're working on a down in a certain spot at the doorbell, but I'm not sure if I'm trying to do too much at once and need to break it down more first?
My dogs down and relax, because they know they may be there for a while.

If the dog is having trouble understanding, then you are moving too fast. I don't know what the dogs proficiency with the required behaviors is, how much freeshaping you have done, how good your timing is... just let the dog tell you when he's ready to move on. You want to build success at first and then proof later IMO.
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