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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-14-2014 07:09 PM
Amurphy26 One of mine preferred buses and lorries to cars but his favourite moving object was a train! That could be scary!


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04-14-2014 04:03 PM
shemeld135 man my pup just started doing this at 10 weeks.. hes a confident pup.. but i told him the car will take him down. ... i will try the distracting or sit and treat tactic when a car comes. it scares the crap out of me!
01-25-2014 02:07 PM
middleofnowhere
Quote:
Originally Posted by sit,stay View Post
My Pug was a horrible car chaser. On walks he would lunge and squeal like a stuck pig when a car would pass us. I was always worried that he would slip out of his harness and get hit. He was also reactive to cars in our back yard, where he could faintly see a car as it drove around a curve that followed our back fence, as it flickered in and out of sight through the fence pickets.

A trainer friend of mine told me that if I wanted to stop a behavior I didn't like (such has his reaction to cars), then I needed to replace it with a behavior I did want. He was very, very food motivated had a ton of tricks he could do on command. So whenever I saw a car approaching, before it got close enough to have all his attention, I would lure him into trick mode with a food reward. His favorite trick was to "dance" (stand on his hind legs and hop from side to side). So there we would be, me holding the treat and him dancing like crazy. It got to the point where he would automatically offer to dance when he heard or saw a car while we were out walking. I never did get a reliable behavior shift when he was out in the back yard. But I did feel a lot safer with him while we were out on leash. Plus, my neighbors loved it! And Riley enjoyed putting on a show.

My point is that it isn't enough to ask a dog to stop an unwanted behavior. You need to replace that unwanted behavior with something you do want to have happen. And the replacement behavior must be more rewarding than the unwanted behavior. For my Pug nothing beat earning a food reward. That trumped the good times he had lunging and losing his mind over passing cars. Maybe you can replace the car chasing with a sit, look at me and a quick game of tug. Or a down, roll over and food reward?

Good luck!
Sheilah
Yup. The youngster wanted to chase cars. Underscore, bold and capitalize "wanted." How I got around it - go out when there was just a little traffic (I lived in town then & could walk at night) and have her sit for a treat when a car was coming. Do this consistently and perhaps for a while reward while the car passes to keep attention. Within a few weeks, fire trucks could go past us with sirens and she'd look to me.
01-25-2014 12:26 PM
Chip18 Not a fan of prongs they can produce fast results of you are" a SKILLED HANDLER" most of us aren’t.

There is some pretty good traditional l advise on here so some that's been covered. I can tell you what I did in the 60's growing up as a kid when had a car chasing Basenji. I had my dad drive the car I sat in the back Chip as always came tearing after the car, I had a bucket of water and when he got close..I dumped the bucket of water on him, problem solved!

He was my first dog and was never trained to do anything beyond sit down and come, not really sure he even knew what a leash was? It was never a problem with any dogs I have had since.

Certainly not NILF but those were pre internet time and I was not going to screw around that kind of behaviour.
01-25-2014 12:01 PM
Amurphy26 I would stick with the reinforcement when sitting. I've had 3 serious car chasers (one was a border collie) and all got fixed by not letting them EVER jump at or try and chase the car. I run with my dogs so it was particularly important so they didn't pull me off the pavement. As soon as a car was approaching it was in the side and sit and wait for the car to pass then a treat when the car has passed. They were always worse when it was one car on a quiet road. I think it was because there were fewer distractions and easier to focus on the one approaching vehicle.

Patience and consistency worked. I would keep away from a prong collar. I personally don't agree with them but that aside they are VERY frowned up in the UK.


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01-25-2014 11:45 AM
Sookie This is the road outside my house - you can see how narrow - that van's side mirror nearly took my head off that walk. So while other areas are wider than that, still not working with a great deal of room.
01-25-2014 11:22 AM
Sookie
Quote:
Originally Posted by sit,stay View Post
My Pug was a horrible car chaser. On walks he would lunge and squeal like a stuck pig when a car would pass us. I was always worried that he would slip out of his harness and get hit. He was also reactive to cars in our back yard, where he could faintly see a car as it drove around a curve that followed our back fence, as it flickered in and out of sight through the fence pickets.

A trainer friend of mine told me that if I wanted to stop a behavior I didn't like (such has his reaction to cars), then I needed to replace it with a behavior I did want. He was very, very food motivated had a ton of tricks he could do on command. So whenever I saw a car approaching, before it got close enough to have all his attention, I would lure him into trick mode with a food reward. His favorite trick was to "dance" (stand on his hind legs and hop from side to side). So there we would be, me holding the treat and him dancing like crazy. It got to the point where he would automatically offer to dance when he heard or saw a car while we were out walking. I never did get a reliable behavior shift when he was out in the back yard. But I did feel a lot safer with him while we were out on leash. Plus, my neighbors loved it! And Riley enjoyed putting on a show.

My point is that it isn't enough to ask a dog to stop an unwanted behavior. You need to replace that unwanted behavior with something you do want to have happen. And the replacement behavior must be more rewarding than the unwanted behavior. For my Pug nothing beat earning a food reward. That trumped the good times he had lunging and losing his mind over passing cars. Maybe you can replace the car chasing with a sit, look at me and a quick game of tug. Or a down, roll over and food reward?

Good luck!
Sheilah
Thanks for this! I love the idea of your pug dancing at cars Sookie never bothers about cars when she is in the garden, unless they are pulling into our driveway, thank God. But I wonder if that is because it is hard to see the road because of the hedgerow.... Anyway, I will try the redirection. She is super food motivated, and also very tug/chase motivated. My cats have one of those feather chase toys and she is obsessed with it but never allowed it. Maybe I will buy her one of her own and only use it for this situation...
(The main annoyance with trying to think of things to do for redirection or distraction is that it is usually such a narrow scrap of roadside we are working with).
01-25-2014 11:17 AM
Sookie
Quote:
Originally Posted by dpc134 View Post
I had the same problem with my pup. I also live out in the country with very little traffic. Also, I rarely walk on the road since I am fortunate to have 100+ acres of woods and fields to walk my dog.
But I did want to train my dog out of chasing cars because my wife likes to take walks on the road with our dog. So, I did what you did and made her sit as a car drove by. I started using rewards / treats to teach the behavior that sitting as a car goes by is good. However, because dogs have a natural instinct to chase stuff (Micheal Ellis calls this "Self Reinforcing Activity" - which is something that a dog does because of their natural instincts and/or they enjoy doing, such as chasing cars, squirrels, etc.), it is difficult to teach them out of this behavior using rewards based training. I am not saying that it is not possible, but it is difficult.
After my pup learned that sitting was good as a car drove by, she got better, but still lunged out of position towards the car as it drove by on some occasion. So then I used prong collar and leash pop to correct her when she lunged. I did this for a few days and she has been very good since then. Good luck and keep practicing.
I did treat her when she came to the side and sat at first, but then stopped because she didn't need the reinforcement anymore. Maybe I should start doing it again, but let her see and sniff the treat but not hand it over until the car is gone and she has not chased....? I live in the UK now, and I have never even seen a prong collar for sale here. I would probably have to order it online, but I wouldn't feel comfortable using it.
It's interesting how they only go for certain cars - I wonder what appeals about some and not others? Maybe I will start keeping a log
01-25-2014 11:00 AM
sit,stay My Pug was a horrible car chaser. On walks he would lunge and squeal like a stuck pig when a car would pass us. I was always worried that he would slip out of his harness and get hit. He was also reactive to cars in our back yard, where he could faintly see a car as it drove around a curve that followed our back fence, as it flickered in and out of sight through the fence pickets.

A trainer friend of mine told me that if I wanted to stop a behavior I didn't like (such has his reaction to cars), then I needed to replace it with a behavior I did want. He was very, very food motivated had a ton of tricks he could do on command. So whenever I saw a car approaching, before it got close enough to have all his attention, I would lure him into trick mode with a food reward. His favorite trick was to "dance" (stand on his hind legs and hop from side to side). So there we would be, me holding the treat and him dancing like crazy. It got to the point where he would automatically offer to dance when he heard or saw a car while we were out walking. I never did get a reliable behavior shift when he was out in the back yard. But I did feel a lot safer with him while we were out on leash. Plus, my neighbors loved it! And Riley enjoyed putting on a show.

My point is that it isn't enough to ask a dog to stop an unwanted behavior. You need to replace that unwanted behavior with something you do want to have happen. And the replacement behavior must be more rewarding than the unwanted behavior. For my Pug nothing beat earning a food reward. That trumped the good times he had lunging and losing his mind over passing cars. Maybe you can replace the car chasing with a sit, look at me and a quick game of tug. Or a down, roll over and food reward?

Good luck!
Sheilah
01-25-2014 10:59 AM
Sookie
Quote:
Originally Posted by doggiedad View Post
is there a busy road near you where you can go
and train? i live on a busy street. i did a lot of
training on my front lawn and near the edge
of the street.
Sorry, what I meant was, when we are in busy areas she doesn't chase cars. In town, the village, or busy areas - she is fine. It is only when on the super narrow rural roads that she does this. Which is, I think, weird.
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