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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-12-2014 07:13 PM
IllinoisNative
Quote:
Originally Posted by shepherdmom View Post
My first dog was an Akita/Shepherd cross. She was in no way mellow. She was ball crazy and in your face. We had cats at the time and she would play and chase them and they would play and chase her. These puppies so far are not like that. But they are only 8 weeks now so I wonder how much their personalities will change as they get older? It will be interesting to see if the temperament test is accurate or if they will change as they grow.
And that is the fascinating thing about mixes. You never who they are going to take after. It could be more shepherd or more akita. You never know.
01-12-2014 06:46 PM
shepherdmom
Quote:
Originally Posted by IllinoisNative View Post
That could be an Akita thing. They are more reserved/independent. I say this as someone who has a chow mix. He came to me at ten weeks as a little adult. I didn't have to train him not to jump because he just didn't. He housebroke himself with very little effort. He wasn't a big biter or barker. Extremely mellow. Naturally good on leash because he wasn't a puller. I've never had a dog like this. But his chow nature is just more reserved and less rambunctious than any thing I've ever experienced...and I've had dogs all my life and took in several rescues. But I've never had a chow.

Of course that independent nature came with the little quirks such as no desire to please me, no interest in chasing balls (which was great because he never chased my cat), hard to motivate, hates the heat, hates exercise. He beats to his own drummer. He'll sit for me if there's food in it for him. Very cat-like.

People who don't like dogs love him because he's not an "in your face" dog, he's fine with a short walk (in fact, prefers it), and he's quiet.

I fostered an Akita/Shepherd mix. Extremely dominant and hated men (more environmental issues on that one). But reserved and mellow in the home. So they can appear mellow and independent because of their nature but still be dominant, soft, etc. That's why temperament testing is fascinating to me.
My first dog was an Akita/Shepherd cross. She was in no way mellow. She was ball crazy and in your face. We had cats at the time and she would play and chase them and they would play and chase her. These puppies so far are not like that. But they are only 8 weeks now so I wonder how much their personalities will change as they get older? It will be interesting to see if the temperament test is accurate or if they will change as they grow.
01-12-2014 03:56 PM
IllinoisNative
Quote:
Originally Posted by shepherdmom View Post
I don't mean to hijack this thread, but I'm really interested in this as we just recently did the temperament test on a rescue litter. Mama is a pure shepherd but daddy we believe is a mix maybe Akita? All of the puppies seemed to be really mellow. No one was interested in chasing an object only one was really scared. Others seemed to take most the stuff in stride. Two were somewhat food aggressive. I would love any thoughts. Feel free to PM
That could be an Akita thing. They are more reserved/independent. I say this as someone who has a chow mix. He came to me at ten weeks as a little adult. I didn't have to train him not to jump because he just didn't. He housebroke himself with very little effort. He wasn't a big biter or barker. Extremely mellow. Naturally good on leash because he wasn't a puller. I've never had a dog like this. But his chow nature is just more reserved and less rambunctious than any thing I've ever experienced...and I've had dogs all my life and took in several rescues. But I've never had a chow.

Of course that independent nature came with the little quirks such as no desire to please me, no interest in chasing balls (which was great because he never chased my cat), hard to motivate, hates the heat, hates exercise. He beats to his own drummer. He'll sit for me if there's food in it for him. Very cat-like.

People who don't like dogs love him because he's not an "in your face" dog, he's fine with a short walk (in fact, prefers it), and he's quiet.

I fostered an Akita/Shepherd mix. Extremely dominant and hated men (more environmental issues on that one). But reserved and mellow in the home. So they can appear mellow and independent because of their nature but still be dominant, soft, etc. That's why temperament testing is fascinating to me.
01-12-2014 01:22 PM
HeidiGS
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx'girl View Post
I agree with Lisa, but that is so far in the puppies future, I'd be focused on the first few weeks now. Hopefully the breeder is helping the large litter by supplementing or giving pups that need it, personal nursing time with mom. A dozen in a litter is extremely competitive at the milk bar. It can stress the weaker ones and give mom some anxiety when they are constantly fighting for a stool or her trying to lay there and feed them constantly. Nutrition is so important too. 12 is almost double the size of normal...so normal in this case is not happening. I hope this isn't the breeders first litter!
It's funny, because she had another buyer who put a deposit down call to see how the mother was doing and how many there were. They made a joke about her having a dozen to the breeder on the 5th puppy lol. Also, she is supplementing the pups with lower growth rates, and I will mention the 7 week age to her. Luckily for her it's not her first ever litter. Thanks for all the advice.
01-12-2014 12:27 PM
shepherdmom
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhczth View Post
I see an "off switch" as a component of nerve strength so don't ever bother mentioning it. I note the "ever ready bunny" puppies in a litter, but those pups will show other areas where they lack nerve. That is just an early sign. Of course the breeder or tester has to know what they are seeing too. They also have to know their lines well.

What I am trying to say in a long about way is that if the breeder or tester misses indications of nerve weakness they probably won't notice a puppy that will have an "off switch".
I don't mean to hijack this thread, but I'm really interested in this as we just recently did the temperament test on a rescue litter. Mama is a pure shepherd but daddy we believe is a mix maybe Akita? All of the puppies seemed to be really mellow. No one was interested in chasing an object only one was really scared. Others seemed to take most the stuff in stride. Two were somewhat food aggressive. I would love any thoughts. Feel free to PM
01-12-2014 11:55 AM
Liesje Two things that I don't like are tail chasing and biting the bars of the crate. Some of that doesn't show itself until later but if I saw it right away it would be a deal breaker for me.
01-12-2014 10:01 AM
lhczth
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jax08 View Post
And ask for one with an off switch
I see an "off switch" as a component of nerve strength so don't ever bother mentioning it. I note the "ever ready bunny" puppies in a litter, but those pups will show other areas where they lack nerve. That is just an early sign. Of course the breeder or tester has to know what they are seeing too. They also have to know their lines well.

What I am trying to say in a long about way is that if the breeder or tester misses indications of nerve weakness they probably won't notice a puppy that will have an "off switch".
01-12-2014 07:56 AM
JakodaCD OA It's great you want to do activities with your future puppy. Personally, first and foremost is a dog I can live with. Walking my dog once a day wouldn't cut it and she does have an "off" switch.
01-11-2014 11:42 PM
Momto2GSDs This site shows an example of the Volhard Aptitude Test that a lot of people use to test the temperaments on pups. Down towards the bottom of the page, shows the interpretation of the numbers. Sounds like a pup with scores of 4's and 3's would be your perfect companion!
Volhard Puppy Aptitude Test
Good luck!
Moms
01-11-2014 10:24 PM
onyx'girl I agree with Lisa, but that is so far in the puppies future, I'd be focused on the first few weeks now. Hopefully the breeder is helping the large litter by supplementing or giving pups that need it, personal nursing time with mom. A dozen in a litter is extremely competitive at the milk bar. It can stress the weaker ones and give mom some anxiety when they are constantly fighting for a stool or her trying to lay there and feed them constantly. Nutrition is so important too. 12 is almost double the size of normal...so normal in this case is not happening. I hope this isn't the breeders first litter!
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