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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-07-2014 02:33 PM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blanketback View Post

Llombardo, there's no sense in being "insulted" when someone says something that's based on personal musings, lol. You know for a fact that it's not the breed but the personality that's what matters. Heck, you know better than most, since it was the TD evaluator who chose your GSD over your Golden, lol!
You have a valid point
01-07-2014 01:02 PM
Msmaria
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackshep View Post
I'd rather give one hard correction than 10 nagging ones. But having said that, I only correct as hard as I need to, in order to get a reaction.

If your dog responds to a sharp "AHH!", then do that rather than pop with the prong, if you know what I mean. Some dogs don't give two hoots about you verbally correcting them, and might need a stronger correction, but I always go with the least amount of correction *that yields results*

It also depends on the situation. If your dog is a bit wound up, they aren't as likely to yield to a softer correction, so you have to really get to know your dog and what works best in certain situations. It's a bit of trial and error
Yes he really does respond to verbal quite well. now thats hes almost a year he did need that correction. I guess i will have to pop his collar (no prong, just flat) a little softer, if he doesnt listen to a verbal.

I had my son help me with an experiment to see how he reacts to my sons verbal and mine. My son has to really use a low voice and get close to him for him to listen to him, but he listens to me 99% of the time the first time. When I corrected him in a lower tone, he put his ears back and then does the command. (I read up on avoidance yesterday because a previous poster mentioned it. I saw him do that when I used a lower less happy tone with him. ears back looked away) The thing is he only does this with me and my daughter.
01-07-2014 12:47 PM
blackshep
Quote:
Originally Posted by Msmaria View Post
What kind of corrections should I give him?
I'd rather give one hard correction than 10 nagging ones. But having said that, I only correct as hard as I need to, in order to get a reaction.

If your dog responds to a sharp "AHH!", then do that rather than pop with the prong, if you know what I mean. Some dogs don't give two hoots about you verbally correcting them, and might need a stronger correction, but I always go with the least amount of correction *that yields results*

It also depends on the situation. If your dog is a bit wound up, they aren't as likely to yield to a softer correction, so you have to really get to know your dog and what works best in certain situations. It's a bit of trial and error
01-07-2014 12:30 PM
Msmaria To answer boomers question. I had never thought about therapy until several people told me Dex would be good at it, including his trainer that trains dogs for the blind. He is very well behaved. (I can only take credit for some of that...lol) That is one of the reasons I looked into it.

Now that I see him changing I am looking into other things. Dexter has HD at a young age so im not looking into sporting work. Therapy was and now Nosework is on our list. Of course the therapy trainer said if its a phase a young dog is going through we can always bring him back to the program because she thinks he would do great otherwise. And recommended i work with strangers to pet him. She has certified quite a few GSDs and said they can do very well as a TD as long as it fits them.

Its still something I would love to do, especially since my brother is a veteran with PSD. I would love to help other veterans/veterans in the hospital by sharing Dexter but I wont force him. My brother and his other veteran friends love GSDs because they are usually seen working in the military, and they feel they have a connection with them.

Sometimes when you work as much as I do, its fulfilling to find one or two hours a week giving back and feeling as if your accomplishing something here on this planet. Volunteering has always been on my to do list. I always feels as if I get more from it than they do for some reason. its a feeling I can explain. Unfortuantely, I dont have much time as I used to. If you asked me a year ago if I would ever own a big dog, never mind a GSD I would have said your crazy. But Dexter just popped into my life and here we are. I thank everyone here for all their advice. i dont know how i would have made it this far with out it.
01-07-2014 12:03 PM
GSDluver4lyfe I think what the other poster was trying to say is that if this particular dog doesnt necessarily solicit attention from others he may be better suited for another task. There are many GSD's who are beyond approachable and love the attention from strangers but alot of GSD's dont and thats ok. As long as being aloof doesnt translate to fearful or nervous or aggressive. That's the beauty of the GSD breed. Nowadays, there is a GSD for nearly every single task and a perfect fit for most because of their versatility. Not saying the breed standard should be overlooked just that there are GSD's on every level of the spectrum.
01-07-2014 12:03 PM
Blanketback
Quote:
Originally Posted by boomer11 View Post
never understand why people want to do therapy work with their gsd? if you want to do that stuff then get a dog that craves attention from strangers like a golden retriever.
Lol, boomer11 - for someone who admits to a lack of understanding on the subject, you sure are opinionated. Here's some fun trivia for you:
"Never idle, always on the go; well disposed to harmless people, but no cringer, crazy about children and always - in love....he was delighted whenever someone gave him attention and he was then the most tractable of dogs." OK, so which famous GSD lover described their very first GSD in that quote? Nobody help him cheat!

Llombardo, there's no sense in being "insulted" when someone says something that's based on personal musings, lol. You know for a fact that it's not the breed but the personality that's what matters. Heck, you know better than most, since it was the TD evaluator who chose your GSD over your Golden, lol!
01-07-2014 02:07 AM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by boomer11 View Post
no offense as i think therapy dogs do great work but how is going around letting people pet you "working"? dog isnt really using its mind or isnt doing anything physically taxing; both things that a german shepherd loves. imo if you think a normal gsd would rather walk around a retirement home over running through an agility course you're fooling yourself.

just saying that therapy work is better suited for a breed that likes attention from strangers. i mean gsd are described as one person dogs for a reason. just my opinion, not meaning to insult.
The GSD standard......It is poised, but when the occasion demands, eager and alert; both fit and willing to serve in its capacity as companion, watchdog, blind leader, herding dog, or guardian, whichever the circumstances may demand. The dog must not be timid, shrinking behind its master or handler; it should not be nervous, looking about or upward with anxious expression or showing nervous reactions, such as tucking of tail, to strange sounds or sights. Lack of confidence under any surroundings is not typical of good character. Any of the above deficiencies in character which indicate shyness must be penalized as very serious faults.....

This description of how a GSD should be is what therapy work is all about. They can't react to anything, they have to have confidence and solid nerves. I have a golden that is certified for therapy and he is almost to happy to do the job, sometimes it takes a more serious dog/breed.
01-07-2014 01:51 AM
boomer11 no offense as i think therapy dogs do great work but how is going around letting people pet you "working"? dog isnt really using its mind or isnt doing anything physically taxing; both things that a german shepherd loves. imo if you think a normal gsd would rather walk around a retirement home over running through an agility course you're fooling yourself.

just saying that therapy work is better suited for a breed that likes attention from strangers. i mean gsd are described as one person dogs for a reason. just my opinion, not meaning to insult.
01-07-2014 12:50 AM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by boomer11 View Post
never understand why people want to do therapy work with their gsd? if you want to do that stuff then get a dog that craves attention from strangers like a golden retriever. a normal gsd (social yet aloof) would hate to be stuck inside with strangers putting their hands all over them. they are one person dogs. they are outside dogs. they want to be outside interacting with you. if i could rank all the activities a normal gsd would enjoy i'd go schuzhund, sar, obedience, agility, dock diving, rally, a bunch more stuff and then therapy work.
This is insulting. Therapy work is a job and any dog that is an "all around" dog should have no problem with it. I can go to a million places with Midnite and he doesn't care one way or another if people approach. He accepts them if they do and can walk right past them if they don't. It's completely different at the nursing home, its like he knows why he is there. I tell him we are going to work and he is in that mode. The interaction between me and him at the nursing home has made our bond stronger then any sport would. He is more normal then lots of GSD's I have met and I wouldn't want him any other way. He excels in everything he does and tries and that is what a GSD is.
01-07-2014 12:12 AM
GSDluver4lyfe
Quote:
Originally Posted by brembo View Post
Curiosity is a double-edged sword in the animal kingdom. There are drawbacks to any extreme of the spectrum of the trait. To my primate mind allowing a hand near my cortex and sensory organs seems pretty dangerous and I would try and control the situation as much as possible. Take it as a compliment, I bet when you reach for Dex's head his ears go down, his eyes soften and he leans into the rub? That's trust and it's special. Why on earth would he trust a stranger with that level of access to his important delicate bits attached to his head?
So true! In alot of ways dogs have been more domesticated than me! I dont want someone petting my head.
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