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Thread: My pups father, please explain structure of him compared to true working line Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-21-2013 05:45 AM
Jmoore728
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponyfarm View Post
Jmoore: trying to learn the differences between working line, german show line, and American show line takes time and effort. You can go to the "Critique My Dog" to get some great info on conformation. Learning the differences in temperament can be more difficult. The best way to do that is take your dog training , learn about him, and then while you are around other GSD, you will learn about them as well. I wouldn't be in a hurry for your next dog..take your time and work/teach/play/train your current puppy. Your current puppy will teach you so much. As you start to learn what you like in a dog, you can start to research breeders and meet folks that have dogs with the attributes you like.

I researched and studied about GSD for two years before I got my puppy. Yea, I guess I am a slow learner and I still don't know much. But, I went for a breeding that was dog/human friendly and I had met some of the relatives. Max has been perfect for me, as a beginner. We have just started going to a Club and he is so fun. Here is a picture of him. He just has basic working line conformation and a great, biddable, fun, goofy, temperament.

Thanks for the advice. Max looks line an awesome GSD...I'm def in no hurry for another one. That will be years down the road. Bane already has me pulling my hair out...lol....Got to love the puppy stage. But he is fun...I love the character of GSD and it will be fun watching him mature and learn new things.....
12-21-2013 05:40 AM
Jmoore728
Quote:
Originally Posted by dogfaeries View Post
No, American show lines (my dog pictured below) do not have a "roached" back.

Very pretty GSD. I would be a proud owner....
12-20-2013 08:34 AM
ponyfarm Jmoore: trying to learn the differences between working line, german show line, and American show line takes time and effort. You can go to the "Critique My Dog" to get some great info on conformation. Learning the differences in temperament can be more difficult. The best way to do that is take your dog training , learn about him, and then while you are around other GSD, you will learn about them as well. I wouldn't be in a hurry for your next dog..take your time and work/teach/play/train your current puppy. Your current puppy will teach you so much. As you start to learn what you like in a dog, you can start to research breeders and meet folks that have dogs with the attributes you like.

I researched and studied about GSD for two years before I got my puppy. Yea, I guess I am a slow learner and I still don't know much. But, I went for a breeding that was dog/human friendly and I had met some of the relatives. Max has been perfect for me, as a beginner. We have just started going to a Club and he is so fun. Here is a picture of him. He just has basic working line conformation and a great, biddable, fun, goofy, temperament.

12-20-2013 08:08 AM
dogfaeries
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmoore728 View Post
Did the American bloodlines start the roachback look and is that what judges are looking for in American GSD shows? The straighter backs look for structurally stable to me. Just my view, I could be totally wrong

No, American show lines (my dog pictured below) do not have a "roached" back.

12-20-2013 05:41 AM
jocoyn The "roach" is more a characteristic of the GERMAN showlines. The American showlines tend to have more angulation in the legs than German dogs but typically have a straight back. There is a lot of overlap between all the different lines, though.

To call a dog roached you really need to see them moving around as the way many dogs are stacked (posed for evaluation) can make a normal dog look as though they have a hump in their back, yet they actually may have a straight back.
12-20-2013 01:40 AM
Jmoore728 Did the American bloodlines start the roachback look and is that what judges are looking for in American GSD shows? The straighter backs look for structurally stable to me. Just my view, I could be totally wrong
12-20-2013 01:00 AM
Jmoore728 Thank you guys very much....My first GSD (female), we only had a short 4 1/2 years with her. When on walks, she was WAY over protective of my family. The breeder actually had some great working lines, but she was just breeding without putting any thought in it. She created some pups with plenty of structural problems and not handing papers over, etc. But she had crazy drive and was very, very good with my family and friends....Starngers she would focus in on with laser precision....Her main drawback, she didn't like other dogs. We had a few encounters with her and our Shih Tzu....Never major injuries, but we were fortunate. It happened random and very quick....On walks, it was tough at times when we came across other dogs.....she acted like they was a threat to us. She would walk right beside the stroller at all time....she was a very loyal dog to us, and I wish we would of for many more years with her...

Right now, my pup is def a handful. He is very very mouthy and my ankles have taken a beating....Man those puppy teeth are SO sharp....I suck it up and redirect him....We did teach him from day one, our 1.5 year old son was off limits. My 4 year old engages him by running to get him to chase him...I'm working to break my son of this....I told him this will create a bad habit and he doesn't want a 90lb dog chasing him and knocking him down. My son wants to be just like daddy and thinks he is a professional trainer....He even picked a certain coat out and told me it was his dog training coat....It causes more work and patience on my part, but I want him be involved with Bane. Bane does have rather large feet.....His mother isn't the red and black....a lot more black. She is very confident.....I only got to see her a couple times after having puppies, so her weight was down a little. Thr breeder bred Mako with her to put more or his working attitude and protection in this litter. Also to improve of the pigmentation (if this is the correct term) and add more red....Her focus was Mako's good working habits, grip! protection. Makos grandfather Ken also had these qualities. Hopefully,it carried over to my pup along with their great temperament

I need to learn to shorten up my posts,,,,I keep typing novels out
12-19-2013 03:49 PM
Freestep *some* working line dogs are not good for novice owners, just like *some* show line dogs. A lot depends on what the dog is bred for. There are certainly some bloodlines that are more serious, sharp, handler-hard, pushy, energetic, etc. that do best with an experienced handler. But there is a wide range. I think the key with working line dogs is to find dogs with solid nerves, high thresholds, and biddability. Those dogs can actually make good pets, because their temperament can handle everyday situations without being nervous, fearful, or defensive. They are eager to please, quick to learn, and forgiving. Of course ALL GSDs (and really all dogs) need training, socialization, and exercise. Working lines tend to have a lot of drive, but should be calm and content to lie at your feet when nothing is going on.
12-19-2013 03:28 PM
selzer The dog you pictured looks very nice. He is not roached. His top line looks ok. I don't like his feet, but if they bred him to a bitch with good feet, then I think that would tend to improve. He has a very nice head, good expression and good color.
12-19-2013 09:59 AM
Andaka
Quote:
I'm aware of the American bloodlines and the "roachback", which I don't like at all....
American showlines aren'troached in the back. They do tend to have longer thighs which gives them a slope to their toplines.



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