German Shepherd Dog Forums - Reply to Topic

Increase font size: 0, 10, 25, 50%

GermanShepherds.com is the premier German Shepherd Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Thread: Contemplating a second dog. Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Trackback
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces):
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
12-13-2013 09:38 AM
OriginalWacky
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waffle Iron View Post
Thanks for the feedback everyone. As for the idea of fostering, that's a way to go I suppose; my concern would be that I'd become to attached to the fostered dog and wouldn't want to give him up.
I've fostered quite a few animals, and cried to see each and every one go. But, it was totally worth it in the end. And yes, a few became "foster failures" that wound up with us for the rest of their lives.

If you're bringing in a puppy, then it's usually easier for an older dog to adapt to them, but you may find a few issues crop up when the youngster hits the brat stage (or you get lucky and wind up with one that doesn't DO brattiness!). I'd say more than half the time it's easier to deal with opposite sex dogs in pairs, so if your bitch is sharp with other dogs, then I'd probably say going with a male is better.

If you're going with a slightly older dog, it's going to depend much more on the individual dogs. Sometimes dogs that you think will have an issue with a second dog will take to a new one far better than you think, and wind up being perfectly happy having another packmate. With an older dog, you'll need to allow up to 12 weeks for their personality to truly show itself in your home.

A rescue that is willing to allow you to foster with an eye toward adoption is awesome, because after a dog has been there for a month or so, and is getting along well is likely to not wind up back in rescue later on. I know there are some shelters that allow a trial period with adoptions, which is a great way to encourage people to give the dogs a chance to adjust without the pressure of feeling that it MUST work out or else.

I've had some extraordinary luck with new animals coming into my home in the past, especially since I'm very conscious of my current animals' dispositions and pay very close attention. In one case, one of our dogs was having some fairly icky issues with resource guarding and general crabbiness with our other dog, and we did the exact opposite of what we should have and wound up adopting a third dog. Somehow, that did her a world of good and her issues all but cleared up, which is not what we expected at all.
12-10-2013 06:55 PM
blehmannwa I agree with possibly fostering. I did not think that Havoc would like a companion because of the way that he reacted towards other dogs on our walks. Although he was raised with other dogs, they were all elderly or ill and pretty much ignored him. When the neighbors brought me a pit pup that they couldn't keep,I was amazed at how much Havoc liked her and those two have never had a problem.
12-10-2013 06:07 PM
Rbeckett I have a little experience in adding singles to my pack over time. I generally go to a neutral location that is neither dogs domain and introduce them there. Depending on who sniffs who's behind first is who usually will become the superior to that dog and the dog who sniffs second will become subordinate. After they have relaxed and the staring or hyper vigilante stares are over and both dogs are laying down I release one at a time from their leash and then allow both to interact for a few minutes. The place I do this at is a large fenced area so I allow them to run and romp a bit if they have behaved to this point. Then when I bring the new pack member home I allow them to regret each other in the front yard on a leash and then move them into the back yard whoch is fenced. You must send out the vibe that this member is joining YOUR pack, and that you will not allow dissent. If you approach it this way you should only have a short period of turmoil till the new pack pecking order is established and the newcomer is incorporated into your pack. The turmoil should be so subdued that you must look for it and watch closely to see who defers to who and who is willing to step over or across who and reinforce your position at the head of the pack by keeping all members of the pack on an equal basis with you. Essentially if your handing out cookies, everybody gets one whether they participated in what caused the cookie or not. Same thing with affection and l ove. Don't cut anybody short to spread the time or love to a new member and they will integrate quickly and with a minimum of fear or even altercations. Hope this helps. We just added our second GSD and she was fully integrated within the first day and the turmoil was over by the second day.... It is how you as the pack leader present the new members and how you maintain discipline within your pack that makes a difference.

Wheelchair Bob
12-10-2013 02:09 PM
gsdsar I have 3 dogs right now. It's a lot if work, but worth it. The biggest hurdle has always been my female GSD. She can be very tough on dogs. While she falls short of me calling her DA, I do keep my eye on her.

When I purchased my 16 mo Labrador, I was lucky enough to be able to send Lena, the GSD, to the Lab breeder for a month for some training and they housed the two together, supervised at first, then all the time. They are best buds now.

I have also done a lot if fostering of GSD, male and female alike. To introduce a new dog into the pack, I would bring along one if my dogs when I picked the foster up. Then when we got home the three of us would go on a walk together. It helped the new dog feel like they had "a friend" in the house. Usually I chose my Lab. She is very dog neutral. But it helped bridge the gap.

I have only once had a foster dog that caused a serious fight. And it was my fault. DO NOT THROW TREATS IN THE AIR TO MULTIPLE DOGS AND NOT EXPECT A FIGHT!!! Lesson learned on my part. But aside from that, I have brought in dogs of all sizes,ages,drive levels.

Make sure you have house rules in place, separate crates, good obedience on your girl, and the ability to monitor and control the situation. A new dog should not be allowed to be rude, they should learn to respect the existing dogs boundaries, no stealing if each other's toys, bones, no pushing the other away from you.

Good Luck!!!


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
12-10-2013 01:50 PM
blackshep
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaRen616 View Post
I think you should try a younger male under 2 years of age.

Introduce them on neutral territory, take them on a walk together and see how it goes, put all of the dog toys away though and feed them separately so that there isn't any possession issues.

I LOVE having more than 1 dog. Watching 2 dogs interact together is awesome.
^^ this!
12-10-2013 01:23 PM
Waffle Iron Thanks for the feedback everyone. As for the idea of fostering, that's a way to go I suppose; my concern would be that I'd become to attached to the fostered dog and wouldn't want to give him up.
12-10-2013 12:36 AM
BellaLuna
Quote:
Originally Posted by martemchik View Post
Haha...she's more than likely staying put.
How did I know lol

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4
12-10-2013 12:23 AM
martemchik
Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaLuna View Post
Any thoughts on keeping her?

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4
Haha...she's more than likely staying put.
12-09-2013 04:57 PM
BellaLuna
Quote:
Originally Posted by martemchik View Post
I'm currently fostering a 2.5 year old female shepherd. She's a year younger than my boy, and about 30 lbs smaller. Both of them are used to being #1 and the only dog so its been an adjustment for both of them. We weren't really worried about any issues that we couldn't handle with a bit of training/supervision.

In the beginning...my boy could get a bit rough with her. She never backed down, but it just was too much for us humans to allow. Luckily a verbal correction works for him and her so its very easy to calm them down. Toys have so far been avoided, but they're definitely learning to play and clearly have been enjoying each other's company over the past week.

The bond takes longer with older dogs. If you get a very young second dog, he'll probably bond to her very quickly. Older dogs tend to be set in their ways and therefore it takes a bit to realize that the pack is permanently changing. Some dogs don't get along at all, others fall in love right away, some will just tolerate each other and never have any positive or negative interactions.

My boy has been able to play very nicely with many dogs, there has also been a small percentage of dogs that he wanted nothing more but to destroy. I wasn't too worried about introducing another dog into my household...but I knew it had to be a female. They're still working out their allowed level of interaction, what's too much, what each one is allowed to do to one another, but most of this is highly monitored and limited by us.
Any thoughts on keeping her?

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4
12-09-2013 04:50 PM
martemchik I'm currently fostering a 2.5 year old female shepherd. She's a year younger than my boy, and about 30 lbs smaller. Both of them are used to being #1 and the only dog so its been an adjustment for both of them. We weren't really worried about any issues that we couldn't handle with a bit of training/supervision.

In the beginning...my boy could get a bit rough with her. She never backed down, but it just was too much for us humans to allow. Luckily a verbal correction works for him and her so its very easy to calm them down. Toys have so far been avoided, but they're definitely learning to play and clearly have been enjoying each other's company over the past week.

The bond takes longer with older dogs. If you get a very young second dog, he'll probably bond to her very quickly. Older dogs tend to be set in their ways and therefore it takes a bit to realize that the pack is permanently changing. Some dogs don't get along at all, others fall in love right away, some will just tolerate each other and never have any positive or negative interactions.

My boy has been able to play very nicely with many dogs, there has also been a small percentage of dogs that he wanted nothing more but to destroy. I wasn't too worried about introducing another dog into my household...but I knew it had to be a female. They're still working out their allowed level of interaction, what's too much, what each one is allowed to do to one another, but most of this is highly monitored and limited by us.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:53 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
PetGuide.com
Basset.net DobermanTalk.com GoldenRetrieverForum.com OurBeagleWorld.com
BoxerForums.com DogForums.com GoPitbull.com PoodleForum.com
BulldogBreeds.com FishForums.com HavaneseForum.com SpoiledMaltese.com
CatForum.com GermanShepherds.com Labradoodle-dogs.net YorkieForum.com
Chihuahua-People.com RetrieverBreeds.com