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Thread: Question about a particularly aggressive bite from a 14 week old pup Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-11-2013 07:56 PM
ImJaxon Hey CM,

The ignoring him works SOOOOOOOOO MUCH BETTER!!!!!

The only problem now is he's big enough to jump straight up on the couch.

Last night I was watching the Grammy's and the doggy came barking and wanting to play.

I ignored him.

Next thing I know I have a 40lb dog sharing the couch with me laying in my lap and licking my face.

HAHAHHAHAHAHA.

Have to admit, it was quite entertaining.

Thanks for your advice, it's been great!
01-30-2013 08:51 PM
Cassidy's Mom
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImJaxon View Post
Yes, thanks. We do not let him bite. I actually do show some emotion sometimes. He will get his front paws up on the couch and just bark to invite me to play. I push him down and say "OFF", but he just thinks that is initiating play, and then jumps up on the couch with his big paws and bites at me. Anything he can catch with his mouth. Sometimes I get so frustrated I yell "NO" at him and I put him in the crate for about 5 minutes, until he forgets why he's there.

Not sure if that's the right thing to do, but he just gets so unmanageable sometimes when he wants to play, that I can't handle him.

lol.
I totally understand your frustration, but that may not be the best way to handle it. Rather than pushing him away (which can definitely be seen as initiating play, and you're also reinforcing the behavior with your attention), I like to completely ignore the dog if they're barking at me or being pushy. It's harder when they're big enough to jump on the couch, but what about if when he does that you immediately get up (don't look at him, and don't say a thing, he's the invisible dog), and walk out of the room? What do you think he would do?

You could also have him wear a drag line around the house, a lightweight leash that you can use to control him rather than grabbing at him with your hands. You could step on it to prevent him from getting on the couch, or use it to calmly remove him from the couch if he jumps up there, or to take him to his crate for a brief timeout if that seems like the only thing that will calm him down.

You want to engage him in play, but you can do it on YOUR terms rather than on his terms, on demand. Even if you make him go away for a few seconds and then invite him back over and play with him for a bit, that's all you need to do. Behavior that's not reinforced will eventually extinguish because it no longer works to get him what he wants, but it can take some time for that to sink in, and in the meantime he may get more persistent if it's worked for him in the past.

I always make sure to acknowledge my dogs when they're NOT being pushy or annoying, when they're just hanging out playing with a toy or calmly chewing a bone, so they get plenty of attention and reinforcement for behavior I want to encourage.

You may already be doing this, but I like to start NILIF with my puppies from the time I bring them home: http://k9deb.com/nilif.htm
01-30-2013 08:10 PM
ImJaxon Yes, thanks. We do not let him bite. I actually do show some emotion sometimes. He will get his front paws up on the couch and just bark to invite me to play. I push him down and say "OFF", but he just thinks that is initiating play, and then jumps up on the couch with his big paws and bites at me. Anything he can catch with his mouth. Sometimes I get so frustrated I yell "NO" at him and I put him in the crate for about 5 minutes, until he forgets why he's there.

Not sure if that's the right thing to do, but he just gets so unmanageable sometimes when he wants to play, that I can't handle him.

lol.


I must correct myself. We play with him for bite inhibition only sometimes. We say "EASY" and he bites very easy, and eventually into a licking pattern. If he bites hard, then we YELP and leave him, as he hurt us, and he has lost his play partners. He's getting very good at bite inhibition. Even to the point where he's very excited, he still remembers in the heat of the moment.
01-30-2013 12:04 PM
Muneraven
Have hope

Jaeger sometimes got too excited and used his teeth too much with us. He learned not to pretty quickly (he is 7 months now). Just be consistent with the rules! Bite play ENDS play. The Big Dog (you) can always take something away, but you aren't mean about it. That sort of thing.

The worst thing in the world is to not have your attention. Walking away from overly-rough play is a terrific deterrent.
01-30-2013 11:49 AM
ImJaxon I started doing your method last night CM. Works pretty good!

Thanks again to everyone for your input!
01-28-2013 09:56 PM
MiraC
Question about a particularly aggressive bite from a 14 week old pup

The pup sounds like he was overtired like when a little kid plays hard . He sure is cute red and black one of my favorite colors


Sent from Petguide.com App
01-28-2013 09:37 PM
Cassidy's Mom Good luck, let us know how it goes! I did so much trading stuff with Halo from the time she was little that she still brings me things to take away from her. She created this game, and it's totally initiated by her - I call it "Can I have that?"


She likes me to hold her bone while she chews it, and she'll go get one and sit in front of me and stare until I get the hint and grab an end. She does the same thing with her Orbee balls. She doesn't even expect me to throw it for her, she just brings it to me, I take it away and give it back a couple of times, and then she goes and lays down to chew it. It's actually pretty cute, and it makes it much easier to take things away when I HAVE to, when she's gotten ahold of something she's not supposed to have, because we have this foundation of trust already established.
01-28-2013 05:07 PM
ImJaxon Oh wow, thanks CM, that is awesome advice. Noted for further use!!
01-25-2013 12:59 PM
Cassidy's Mom
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImJaxon View Post
We roll the ball and he stays until we say "OK" and he runs and gets the ball and brings it back. Problem is puppy doesn't give us the ball back. So, we say "SIT" and then we reach for the ball and ask him to "DROP IT" sometimes he does, sometimes not. Depends on how excited he is.
Have you tried using food to get him to drop the ball? I'll use a very yummy smelly treat, and put it right up to the puppy's nose before asking for them them to drop the ball. When they do, mark it ("yes!") and give the treat. You're basically trading a treat for the ball, and teaching an association between your command and the behavior of giving up the toy. You can do this with a tug too.

As quickly as I can, I switch from showing the treat first, to having treats out of sight, in a treat bag or pocket, and only pulling one out AFTER the puppy has dropped the ball/toy - you don't want him to become dependent on the sight of a treat in order to comply with the command.

From there, I transition to the only reward being praise, and then I throw the ball again, or give the toy back. Treats are no longer necessary because the reward is continuation of play, the food is only to teach what the verbal cue means.

It's a good idea to work with him on trading, where you hold one end of a toy (anything tuggable) or a low value bone (Nylabones are good for this), while the dog chews the bone, or tugs with the toy. Work on your "drop it" command, trading a treat for the toy or bone, and then giving it back. Because you continue holding onto the end of whatever, you still "own" it, and he can't go off on his own and refuse to give it back. When you're done playing, end the session and put the toy away, or let him take the bone and chew it on his own for awhile if you wish.

Establishing a foundation of trust, where he gives you "his" things for a reward, and either gets them back again or he gets a treat AND he gets it back again, makes it much less likely that he will become a resource guarder.

Another thing for retrieving a ball is to teach him to bring it right to your hand, so he's targeting your hand with the ball before getting the reward. We do this in flyball training with dogs who tend to spit the ball out too soon, either while still going over the jumps, or before or slightly after crossing the start/finish line.
01-25-2013 12:39 PM
ImJaxon Hey thanks you guys! This stuff is really helpful. We've already altered what we're doing and no more really wild and out of control dog!

Thanks
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