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lefetz 04-13-2014 11:11 PM

HI!
 
I am looking forward to all your knowledge, tips and tricks! I recently lost my dogs due to old age and decided that I wanted to foster. I have never owned a GSD and now I am fostering one. We are 3 weeks in now and everything has gone really well, better than expected that's for sure. He was an extreme cruelty case, 8 yrs on a 5'chain, in a vacant lot, guarding some machinery... 24/7/365 ... can you imagine? I want to make sure I do the right thing for him and teach him manners so he can spend his senior years with peace, love and comfort. How do you teach an elderly dog manners? His nose is in overdrive and he can be somewhat of a bully when he wants to "check a person" out.

Pax8 04-13-2014 11:31 PM

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Welcome to the forum and congrats on your foster! :) My last dog came from a similar situation chained in a back yard with little to no contact besides food and water from 8 weeks to a year and a half old, so I understand having to catch up on manners! If his nose is in overdrive, it sounds like he may work for some nice-smelling food. Positive reinforcement would be a good way to go for a dog that has had a rough start like that. I would start with the basics - sit, down, stay, come etc. If you're not sure about your training skills, you could always hire a trainer to help you out or attend a class.

Shepherds are smart and you can establish some good boundaries early on by being firm and consistent. If he's a bully when greeting people, I would teach him a good sit-stay so you can park him on the floor a short distance from the door when greeting people. Possibly a back up, or a side or heel position for out in public so he doesn't spring ahead to check a person out. If he is persistent, you can physically back him up by just blocking off his path to a person he wants to check out or you can back him up by just shuffling into him.

TigervTeMar 04-13-2014 11:39 PM

thank you for giving this dog a new home

lefetz 04-14-2014 12:00 AM

Thanks for your response Pax8! My training skills are a tad rusty but since having him they are coming back. My other dogs were a 110Lb Lab and a Aust Shep.... so I know about the brains and the brawn. Your right, this guy is smart. But sitting is very hard on him due to spinal issues and atrophy in his legs.

Pax8 04-14-2014 12:03 AM

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Quote:

Originally Posted by lefetz (Post 5370849)
Thanks for your response Pax8! My training skills are a tad rusty but since having him they are coming back. My other dogs were a 110Lb Lab and a Aust Shep.... so I know about the brains and the brawn. Your right, this guy is smart. But sitting is very hard on him due to spinal issues and atrophy in his legs.

Poor boy! I'm glad he's found a comfortable home!

It doesn't necessarily have to be a sit. The more important part of that is the stay part. I usually try to teach a sit or a down because they are less likely to try to move forward. Is a down more comfortable for him? If not, a stand stay would work as well, it is just much easier for them to break a stay from a standing position.

Mister C 04-14-2014 08:40 AM

Thank you for giving this GSD a good home.


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