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Old 02-10-2015, 08:51 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Seizure during sleep

My dog had a seizure at 3am this morning, while sleeping. It scared the crap out of me, and I'm wondering if anyone else's GSD here has done this - I guess I'm looking for a sort of 'what to expect' going forward? Not that it means anything, each dog will need to be seen by a vet and get a proper diagnosis - we're going in this afternoon for that. I'm scared for what this means for my young 3 year old sweetheart.
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Old 02-10-2015, 08:58 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Blanketback View Post
My dog had a seizure at 3am this morning, while sleeping. It scared the crap out of me, and I'm wondering if anyone else's GSD here has done this - I guess I'm looking for a sort of 'what to expect' going forward? Not that it means anything, each dog will need to be seen by a vet and get a proper diagnosis - we're going in this afternoon for that. I'm scared for what this means for my young 3 year old sweetheart.
For my own education....could you describe the nature of this seizure as I am unfamiliar with this....I did a quick search on seizures in dogs and found this "Symptoms can include collapsing, jerking, stiffening, muscle twitching, loss of consciousness, drooling, chomping, tongue chewing, or foaming at the mouth. Dogs can fall to the side and make paddling motions with their legs. They sometimes poop or pee during the seizure." Is any of this consistent with what you unfortunately had to witness?

I certainly hope your dog is doing better and you find the cause of this frightening event.

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Old 02-10-2015, 09:11 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Beautiful loveable Remy. So unfair.

I suggest you go to your holistic vet. See if they offer hair analysis and ask about testing for lead poisoning as well as magnesium deficiency. The holistic vet may suggest Skull Cap, valerian root etc. Try this method first. The conventional vet is going to give you drugs that can cause liver toxicity, so you will be looking at adding milk thistle too in that regard.

Seizures can also be a result of toxins such as aluminum found in environment and vaccines, this causes neurotoxicity as aluminum can/does pass the blood brain barrier.
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Old 02-10-2015, 09:20 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Was/has Remy been treated with any meds recently?
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Old 02-10-2015, 09:27 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Thanks for the quick responses, guys!

The jerking, stiffening, muscle twitching, loss of consciousness, chomping, foaming at the mouth, making paddling motions with his legs - these were all consistent with his seizure. He didn't lose control of his bladder. This lasted for what seemed like a long time, but it was so effing scary - it might have been under a minute? IDK. I'd never experienced anything like this, and I thought he was dying.

ETA: no recent meds, no access to poisons - nothing I can think of to bring this on.

I'm wondering if this is epilepsy, or something else. It seems that GSDs are prone to seizures - but why? I'm in the dark here, and obviously very worried.

Last edited by Blanketback; 02-10-2015 at 09:33 AM.
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Old 02-10-2015, 09:30 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Have his blood sugar levels checked too, Not sure if this means he needs to be fasted. Call and ask, most blood work should be done on a fast.

Many causes, and epilepsy IMO is a term for seizures, not a diagnosis
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Old 02-10-2015, 09:32 AM   #7 (permalink)
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I think it depends on the cause. The last foster I had who seized went through a lot of testing -- first they looked for a metabolic cause (with lots of bloodwork at the emergency vet immediate after the seizure). This was to rule out accidental ingestion of anything that might have caused it, among other things.

If it's possible to do an MRI, that may get suggested by the vet too, to rule out a tumor. This is very expensive to do, and it's not even available everywhere. However, a tumor is the scariest of all the possibilities, as I've heard these tumors are aggressive and untreatable. This is the possibility you most want to take off the table, for your peace of mind.

The most likely scenario is that it might turn out to be idiopathic epilepsy, and the vet will prescribe anti-seizure meds (several RX options). They work pretty well, and they are very inexpensive (they can be purchased from the people pharmacy as generics). My seizure foster ended up doing great on meds, and they controlled her condition wonderfully. We did have to do several rounds of follow-up bloodwork to get the levels right, but that wasn't a big deal.

Seizures are very frightening to watch. I'm so sorry you are going through this. (By the way, if it happens again, try to time it. Also take notes in a notebook right after -- note the duration, and if there was more than one (a "cluster" of seizures). This information gets asked for by the vets, and as you know, 30 seconds of watching that feels like 30 minutes because it seems to last so long.)

Last edited by Magwart; 02-10-2015 at 09:36 AM.
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Old 02-10-2015, 09:56 AM   #8 (permalink)
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It's a horrible thing to watch, but at least if it happens again, then I'll know what to expect. If anyone else stumbles upon this thread (as I'm going through old posts myself atm) the aftermath is very bizarre! My dog was totally disoriented, and didn't seem to even know where he was, or even me.

Because of all the foaming, after he 'came to' I went to get paper towels to clean up the carpet. He sleeps beside my bed, so this event woke me up. Anyway, when I reentered the bedroom, he focused on the paper towel in my hand and gave a small growl, and also motioned in a fearful way - kind of a slinky crouch. Like something you'd expect to see from a dog that's expecting someone to strike it or something! It was awful, really. I just put the paper towel down, and told him it was ok to be disoriented after something like that, and I didn't want him more upset, so I left the room. That was hard.

After about 10 minutes (again, could be less) I reentered the bedroom, and grabbed my laptop to see WTF had just happened to my dog. By this time, he had recovered and was back to his old loverboy self. Actually, even more so than usual. I couldn't use the laptop because he was literally climbing all over me - like even crawling up behind my neck, like a cat might.

He's back to normal this morning. I wonder if this is something that could be a rare occurrence, never to happen again? I can't handle thinking about a tumor right now, although I guess I shouldn't exclude the worst case scenario either. Sigh, it's so hard not to just start bawling like a baby here.
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Old 02-10-2015, 10:28 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Don't assume the worst case -- that's the least likely scenario.

He needs to go to a vet today for bloodwork to look for any leftover traces of possible metabolic causes. Get into detective mode today with your vet.
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Old 02-10-2015, 10:34 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Thanks Magwart! Ugh, these are going to be longest 3 hours of my life...that's when I see my vet, and we can start to figure this out. Oh crap, eh?

In another member's post (can't remember who, sorry) they said that they freaked out during their dog's first seizure, but in subsequent seizures they remained calm, and they saw that this had a beneficial effect on how their dog reacted after the seizure. I'll admit right now that I was *freaking out bigtime* while my dog was having his, so maybe I was the cause of his strange post-seizure behavior. Poor guy.

Last edited by Blanketback; 02-10-2015 at 10:36 AM.
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