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Old 01-18-2013, 02:22 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis

Hi, I have a new problem again.
It seems we have another dog with autoimmune disease.
So Jago, our gsd tervueren mix started vomiting few weeks ago. Half an hour after eating he vomited everything. We went to vet, exams, stomach flip etc, they said he has is an inflammatory bowel and stomach, maybe genetic, maybe caused by worms from his old life (he is adopted more then a year ago), but it seems like an autoimmune sourced disorder. We are so scared, we had our Duncan, died three years ago, he had autoimmune disease, he had different symptoms, but the autoimmune disease is not joke, it is not a secret of a long life.
Our vet said, the treatment is a diet, he get some gastro-potective medicine and pills "Losec" maybe it's different in Your contry, it's given to the pancreatic cancer. He said, we have to wait three months, and if it's not better we have to start a Prednisone threatment. I'm scared of Predniosone!!! Prednisone threatment killed my Betty in her Young ages, and Prednisone threatment made my Duncan's life shorter.
It's not fair, we have to see them all die!!!
Have You ever heared this Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis?
Do You know this disease? What is the threatment in Your country? Here the only way is the steroide-care, we all know this is the way to ****.
Please help if You can, we need advice what to do.

Sorry for any mispelling but I'm shocked and nervous

[IMG][/IMG]
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RIP Bonny,Duncan Betty and Tina our little stars in Heaven

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Old 01-18-2013, 02:37 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Sorry to hear that your Jago has a health issue, he is a very handsome boy. I have no knowledge about this disease, maybe someone will come along later and have a suggestion for you. Best wishes and healing thoughts coming your way for your boy to get better.
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Old 01-18-2013, 02:47 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Poor pup. What are you feeding? I'm wondering if a change in diet and smaller more frequent meals would help.
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Old 01-18-2013, 02:50 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANDB View Post
Poor pup. What are you feeding? I'm wondering if a change in diet and smaller more frequent meals would help.
I think the change of meal will not help. This is the reason I wrote here, to get any advice from somebody from similar situation
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RIP Bonny,Duncan Betty and Tina our little stars in Heaven

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Old 01-18-2013, 02:55 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis in Dogs | Stomach Inflammation | Diarrhea in Dogs | petMD

Merck Veterinary Manual

First, if it is IBD, a dietary change may help. So, what are you feeding? This could be caused by an intolerance to a food. IBD in my cat is from some mystery ingredient in kibble and supplements. A raw diet solved the problem.

Second, you need to get rid of the inflammation in the gut which starts with soothing the gut. Are you feeding probiotics? Digestive enzymes? Giving any slippery elm to coat his stomach?

Was any bloodwork done? Xrays for blockages?
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Old 01-18-2013, 03:34 PM   #6 (permalink)
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First off a change in diet is crucial...feeding a biologically appropriate diet (RAW) - LOW FAT (hardest to digest) carbohydrate free (sugars feed pathogens that may not have been detected and elevated eosiniphils (sp.?) may be as a result of this) SIBO comes to mind to...has he been tested for EPI?

A Natural B vitamin complex (not a B50 or B100 where all are the same mg.'s thes are synthetic) - look for a brand that contains B12 in "methylcobalamin" form NOT "cyano" - and a no flush niacin (b3), B3 is indicated to fight infectious pathogens - B12 and "B's" in general are depleted with diarrhea.

A good pancreatin digestive enzyme to help hydrolize the proteins for better absorption - to assist the body to help repair itself - takes some of the stress off the pancreas and liver as they don't have to work as hard.

Adding "raw organic cold pressed coconut oi" - also helps with pathogens and replaces fats required where fat digestion is compromised.

Herbal as mentioned - slippery elm bark - this is like an internal band-aide for the GI tract from mouth to rectum - this forms a mucosal barrier so pathogens cannot adhere to the lining causing scarring.

Probiotics to replace good bacteria and promote digestion

Colostrum - see links (re: auto-immune mediated)

for IBD, gastroenteritis of all kinds, hemorrhagic enteritis, colitis, non-specific diarrheas, absorption deficiencies, pancreatitis, constipation, obstipation, and food allergies. It has helped in all of these conditions and has no adverse side effects. It is not a panacea for these problems, but it is very effective in aiding the healing process necessary for resolving these conditions. I have noted that homeopathic cases of mine, that I felt were properly repertorized but had not responded, were now responding with the addition of colostrum.

BOVINE COLOSTRUM: THE FORGOTTEN MIRACLE Dogs Naturally Magazine

Research has identified an ingredient called praline-rich polypeptide (PRP) as one of the main components of colostrum that is responsible for eliminating or improving the symptoms of allergies. It is also thought to be potentially useful for other autoimmune conditions. According to Staroscik et al, 1983 (Molecular Immunology, Vol. 20, No. 12, pp. 1277-1282), PRP has the same ability to regulate activity of the immune system as do hormones produced by the thymus gland. It can stimulate an under-active system into dealing with disease-causing organisms and it can also suppress an over-active system which results from autoimmune disorders and allergic reactions.
PRPís ability to reduce allergic symptoms is thought to be partly due to inhibition of the lymphocyte (white blood cell) and T-cell overproduction that is normally associated with an allergic reaction. PRP may also assist in the creation of special cells (helper T-cells and suppressor T-cells) which suppress and switch off the immune response. Other studies have shown that PRP is highly anti-inflammatory, which helps to reduce the effects of the histamine that has been released.

COLOSTRUM FOR DOG ALLERGIES Dogs Naturally Magazine

Containing both broad spectrum and specific factors, Colostrum assists the body in combating bacterial, viral, fungal and allergenic marauders. Colostrum is the only food that augments the body with the immune factors needed to fight infection: Immunoglobulins, Leukocytes, Cytokines, Lactoferrin, Interferon and PRP. PRP (Polyproline-Rich Peptides) is the paramount legislator of the thymus gland, which is charged with producing cells to thwart viruses and antigens. PRP harmonizes the immune system, preventing the body from actually attacking itself, as is seen in diseases like MS, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, Epstein-Barr, and Allergies.


Further - herb "Andrographis" is indicted for IBD
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Old 01-18-2013, 03:56 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a dog

It is a disease of exclusion. Was SIBO/epi ruled out?

What food is the dog eating now?

I would use Natural Balance with a UNIQUE protein source such as Venison or Bison.

(from the link above)
Dogs with IBD may be malnourished and have increased needs for protein and energy (3). The diet must be highly digestible and hypoallergenic; it must also be palatable and provide the energy and nutrients required.

Many dogs with IBD respond favorably to an elimination diet, which should have a single, novel protein source and a highly digestible, gluten-free carbohydrate source (1,3,4). A low fat diet is more easily tolerated, as it is less likely to delay gastric emptying (4). If the colon is affected (EGE), increasing dietary fiber may alleviate signs of large bowel involvement (diarrhea and tenesmus) (1).

Fiber increases fecal bulk, improves colonic motility, and binds water and irritants (1,4). Many hypoallergenic formulations are now commercially available. Although homemade recipes are available, they may be unsuitable for long-term feeding (3,4). Owners must be made aware that treats, table scraps, flavored medications, and rawhides may contain antigenic components and should be avoided (3,4).

Dogs with severe or refractory IBD may benefit from commercially available formulations containing starch and a hydrolyzed protein source (Ralston Purina CNM HA-Formula; Ralston Purina, St. Louis, Missouri, USA). These protein and carbohydrate sources are presented as smaller molecules and may be less likely to evoke a hypersensitivity response (4,5).
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Old 01-18-2013, 04:01 PM   #8 (permalink)
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JAX08, next step is a bloodwork, I'll inform You.
GatorBytes, we are about to do EPI test.
We are so sad.
My vets needed to advice these exams, but I received any advice from overseas!
We payed a lot of money to know what the problem is, but without Your help we would be deaf and blind.
I'll inform You later
Thanks for all
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Roxie, Jenny GSD-s, Jago,Charly and Lilly
RIP Bonny,Duncan Betty and Tina our little stars in Heaven

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Old 01-18-2013, 04:06 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msvette2u View Post
Eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a dog

It is a disease of exclusion. Was SIBO/epi ruled out?

What food is the dog eating now?

I would use Natural Balance with a UNIQUE protein source such as Venison or Bison.

(from the link above)
Dogs with IBD may be malnourished and have increased needs for protein and energy (3). The diet must be highly digestible and hypoallergenic; it must also be palatable and provide the energy and nutrients required.

Many dogs with IBD respond favorably to an elimination diet, which should have a single, novel protein source and a highly digestible, gluten-free carbohydrate source (1,3,4). A low fat diet is more easily tolerated, as it is less likely to delay gastric emptying (4). If the colon is affected (EGE), increasing dietary fiber may alleviate signs of large bowel involvement (diarrhea and tenesmus) (1).

Fiber increases fecal bulk, improves colonic motility, and binds water and irritants (1,4). Many hypoallergenic formulations are now commercially available. Although homemade recipes are available, they may be unsuitable for long-term feeding (3,4). Owners must be made aware that treats, table scraps, flavored medications, and rawhides may contain antigenic components and should be avoided (3,4).

Dogs with severe or refractory IBD may benefit from commercially available formulations containing starch and a hydrolyzed protein source (Ralston Purina CNM HA-Formula; Ralston Purina, St. Louis, Missouri, USA). These protein and carbohydrate sources are presented as smaller molecules and may be less likely to evoke a hypersensitivity response (4,5).
Thank You for the link, I had forwarded to my vet
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Roxie, Jenny GSD-s, Jago,Charly and Lilly
RIP Bonny,Duncan Betty and Tina our little stars in Heaven

http://duncan.hu
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Old 01-18-2013, 04:10 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Have your vet call to consult with these folks here in WA state. They may have more ideas.

Contact Information for the Veterinary Teaching Hospital They are the best in our area!!

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences
College of Veterinary Medicine
Washington State University
Pullman, WA 99164-7060

Telephone: 509-335-0711 FAX: 509-335-3330 EMAIL: VTH@vetmed.wsu.edu

Main Hospital Switchboard & Emergencies 509-335-0711

During regular hours you may contact the specific section or service from the list below or phone
509-335-0711
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