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Old 12-02-2012, 10:11 AM   #11 (permalink)
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There is congenital and acquired...sometimes it's a symptom of heavy metal toxicity like lead.
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Old 12-02-2012, 10:24 AM   #12 (permalink)
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I have a rescue girl that will occasionally vomit after eating. I noticed it was mostly when she ate fast and especially when she was immediately let out of the crate after eating. I now leave her in the crate for 20-30 mins after eating and the problem is gone. Using a slow feeder bowl can help as well. Or you can just put a large object like a paper weight or ball in the middle of the bowl so the dog eats around it thereby slowing down consumption. She just needs to sit and relax for a few after eating. Otherwise, she will occasionally vomit a little water or food. She has some allergy issues as well and had parvo in the shelter. But other than that, she is fine and this is not a huge deal in her life.
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Old 12-03-2012, 04:34 PM   #13 (permalink)
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There could be MULTIPLE causes, and without a diagnostic workup it is impossible to tell. Some things to think about right off the bat, how long has this been going on? A couple days vs. a couple weeks? Or a couple months? Has your dog otherwise stayed the same as far as attitude and energy level? What does the vomiting itself look like, and what does the vomited food look like?

A few things I always think about right off the bat -

Number 1, because I work in emergency medicine and see this a lot, foreign body. If your dog has only been vomiting after eating and drinking for a couple days, if he appears lethargic, painful, loss of appetite, inability to keep food down, diarrhea, and a history of eating things or you notice something around the house is missing, could all be signs of a foreign body.

MegaE, as others have mentioned. Can be chronic OR aqquired, can also worsen as a dog ages (therefor symptoms become more apparent). Telling sign of this, dogs do not VOMIT. They REGURGITATE because they are unable to swallow. Vomiting is FORCED expulsion, the dog hacks, heaves, etc. Regurgitation, the food literally falls out of the mouth. There is no heaving, no forcing. Food/water just slides right out. Regurge from a MegaE dog also tends to have a similar appearance, some say it looks like a "snake coil". The food sits in the esophagus and forms into a long form, and when it comes up appears coiled.

Perhaps your dog drinks or eats too fast/too much at a time. This is very common, especially in breeds like labs. Water intake can be limited to only leaving a cup or so out at a time so the dog can't gulp large amounts at a time. Special food bowls are also made with grooves and bumps in them that stop the dog from eating too fast. You can also achieve this by placing a large stone in there as long as the dog doesn't injure himself on it.

Some type of gastroenteritis could be the cause, if the stomach is upset then any eating or drinking could cause vomiting.

Obviously, your vet is the best place to start.
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Old 12-03-2012, 08:49 PM   #14 (permalink)
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There is congenital and acquired...sometimes it's a symptom of heavy metal toxicity like lead.
Can you please provide a link to your source?
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Old 12-03-2012, 09:07 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Can you please provide a link to your source?
There is a quick ref. list on this link (w/o having to read whole article) under Peripheral Neuropathies

Canine and Feline Mega Esophagus

Other causes...organophosphates aka pesticide poisoning
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Old 12-03-2012, 09:48 PM   #16 (permalink)
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I was going to ask about an obstruction . Is this dog given rawhide, pigs ears ? Does the dog have a hernia ?
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Old 12-03-2012, 11:16 PM   #17 (permalink)
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I have a few dogs that do this all the time. Especially the water.

Like us, I think they can just kinda regurgitate a little. My dogs are healthy, haven't lose weight, haven't aspirated, they just get busy drinking and then a slight "urp" and a bit of water comes out.

To avoid this - a few things, you can soak the food before the dog eats it, and also use a slow feeder.

My parents Schnauzer throws up almost every time she eats, as she eats too fast.
The kibble is too big (not chewed), so she pukes it back up.
Soaking and using a slow feeder, she never has an issue. The food is softened and already mushy so she can use it easier without needing extra water afterwards.

If you do this, be sure to remove the (bowl of) water for about 20-30 min. after eating so the water doesn't slosh around and make the food slosh out.

It is not rare at all for dogs to not chew kibble, btw. Not sure if yours does or doesn't, but that could be part of the issue, if he's not chewing the kibble fully.
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Old 12-03-2012, 11:31 PM   #18 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatorBytes View Post
There is a quick ref. list on this link (w/o having to read whole article) under Peripheral Neuropathies

Canine and Feline Mega Esophagus

Other causes...organophosphates aka pesticide poisoning
From what I can tell, this says the lead toxicity is in reference to cats?
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Old 12-04-2012, 12:12 AM   #19 (permalink)
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From what I can tell, this says the lead toxicity is in reference to cats?
Lead is a neurotoxin in animal and human. Hence recalls in toys containing lead, lead paint in old houses....never chew on pencils
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Old 12-04-2012, 12:19 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Yes. But you said it was a cause of ME in dogs. That link you posted says a possible link in CATS not dogs. They are not the same.
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