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-   -   Breeding my German Shepherd (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/genetic-issues/441217-breeding-my-german-shepherd.html)

Mckenzie.H 04-21-2014 08:30 PM

Breeding my German Shepherd
 
Okay I'm breeding my German Shepherd, she is currently still a puppy but she is planned to become a mother with a cream and tan Sire, which is 7 weeks old. I don't know what the out come of the looks of the puppies will be, and I hope for long hair. The father of the female is about long hair but still alot long than the mothers- very short and thin. Any help here?:confused:

onyx'girl 04-21-2014 08:38 PM

There is way more to planning litters than color/coat. What would make the puppies that you have now breedworthy? Do you have pedigree information on either one of them?
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum...flowchart.html and many other links in the breeding forum are worth taking the time to read.

Twyla 04-21-2014 09:28 PM

Have you talked with your puppy's breeder? What is his/her opinion of this match? Have they explained all the steps that you need to take with this pup if you want a quality breeding?

zyppi 04-21-2014 09:47 PM

read and learn...

onyx'girl 04-21-2014 09:49 PM

These two aren't named Thor and Victoria are they?

selzer 04-21-2014 10:11 PM

I hope you aren't in a hurry. The boy should be about 2 years old or older, so you have plenty of time to learn a lot about the whole process, about bloodlines, and the standard, about genetics and how the colors/coats actually work -- though these are the last things that should be considered in a breeding.

There is a lot to take into consideration, like finding the best homes for your pups, and what you can do now to give them the best chance, sort of stack the deck in their favor so to speak when it comes to finding good homes.

You will hear a lot of crap on these threads about who should breed and why you should breed dogs or not breed dogs. I am only going to say that it can break your heart, when you realize through your action or inaction you failed to keep a puppy alive, or when you lose a bitch that you love because something went wrong and you did not know the signs, because your vet said something and you did not know enough to walk out, discard their advice and rush the dog/pups to a specialist.

So stick around in the forum and read everything, specifically the threads on breeding. Try to get past snarky comments and attitudes, and be open-minded rather than defensive. And hopefully, by the time your puppy is old enough, you will be in a better place to make the best choices for your dogs.

Cara Fusinato 04-21-2014 11:09 PM

Dear poster -- it's a really really complicated thing to breed healthy dogs and then find homes for them so they never end up unwanted and scared and put to death in shelters. Please start learning about everything involved before you make any decisions on it. It's just a very very big committment and like said, can be heartbreaking.

Some things to think about. If you want to make money, you have to have one heck of an operation with titled animals and expensive parent dogs and lots of testing for health (eyes, elbows, hips, and several more things you don't even realize are a problem). Most of these tests have to be done 2-3 years and involve vets doing some pricey tests. Your dog and the other dog gentically need to be a good combo mentally and physically. You have to study pedigrees for that as well as the pesonalities of both dogs. You want to produce puppies that are physically healthy and mentally sound or they will end up abandoned. What if your dog needs a C-section? To save mom and pups can be a couple thousand dollars. Plus pups have to be vet checked and given shots which is expensive. Can you handle pups that don't make it? It is heartbreaking to deliver a little one and it doesn't survive. Do you have time to tube/bottle feed if momma can't? Then you have to find a way to advertise. Does your area have restrictions on that? Mine does. You have to have a license on the mom and give that number in ads and if you have too many litters or dogs there are problems there with the county and fines. You have to watch out because people hunt the ads to buy bait dogs for fighting training and also for medical testing and such. They really know how to fake you out too. You also have to know how to socialize puppies and start them out right from the beginning so they are mentally stable. What if you sell a puppy and someone thinks it is sick and wants you to take it back and give them their money back? What will you do with a sick puppy or one a pet owner totally screwed up with lack of care? Someone I know on the sheltie board had this scenario. She spent thousands to fix up a pup of hers that had been mistreated and neglected and had mental and physical issues from that. What if you can't sell your puppies? Do you keep them? Will you take them back in 5 years when the families flake out and call you hysterical that they lost their job, home, etc. and if you don't take the dog they have to take it to the shelter?

I wish it were all as simple as having two really great dogs produce a bunch of great healthy puppies that people are waiting in line for and will take care of for their whole long healthy lives, but it isn't like that and it is not fair to create little souls without offering them great lives. The pet overpopulation problem is SO huge. It's important if one decides to breed to make sure that for no reason the puppies end up in that system.

Not judging, not being mean, just pointing out so many things that make breeding dogs, especially a challenging breed like GSD's, just not as fun as it sounds.

Best wishes with your pet and your decision.

Heidigsd 04-22-2014 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cara Fusinato (Post 5411649)
Dear poster -- it's a really really complicated thing to breed healthy dogs and then find homes for them so they never end up unwanted and scared and put to death in shelters. Please start learning about everything involved before you make any decisions on it. It's just a very very big committment and like said, can be heartbreaking.

Some things to think about. If you want to make money, you have to have one heck of an operation with titled animals and expensive parent dogs and lots of testing for health (eyes, elbows, hips, and several more things you don't even realize are a problem). Most of these tests have to be done 2-3 years and involve vets doing some pricey tests. Your dog and the other dog gentically need to be a good combo mentally and physically. You have to study pedigrees for that as well as the pesonalities of both dogs. You want to produce puppies that are physically healthy and mentally sound or they will end up abandoned. What if your dog needs a C-section? To save mom and pups can be a couple thousand dollars. Plus pups have to be vet checked and given shots which is expensive. Can you handle pups that don't make it? It is heartbreaking to deliver a little one and it doesn't survive. Do you have time to tube/bottle feed if momma can't? Then you have to find a way to advertise. Does your area have restrictions on that? Mine does. You have to have a license on the mom and give that number in ads and if you have too many litters or dogs there are problems there with the county and fines. You have to watch out because people hunt the ads to buy bait dogs for fighting training and also for medical testing and such. They really know how to fake you out too. You also have to know how to socialize puppies and start them out right from the beginning so they are mentally stable. What if you sell a puppy and someone thinks it is sick and wants you to take it back and give them their money back? What will you do with a sick puppy or one a pet owner totally screwed up with lack of care? Someone I know on the sheltie board had this scenario. She spent thousands to fix up a pup of hers that had been mistreated and neglected and had mental and physical issues from that. What if you can't sell your puppies? Do you keep them? Will you take them back in 5 years when the families flake out and call you hysterical that they lost their job, home, etc. and if you don't take the dog they have to take it to the shelter?

I wish it were all as simple as having two really great dogs produce a bunch of great healthy puppies that people are waiting in line for and will take care of for their whole long healthy lives, but it isn't like that and it is not fair to create little souls without offering them great lives. The pet overpopulation problem is SO huge. It's important if one decides to breed to make sure that for no reason the puppies end up in that system.

Not judging, not being mean, just pointing out so many things that make breeding dogs, especially a challenging breed like GSD's, just not as fun as it sounds.

Best wishes with your pet and your decision.

Great post :thumbup:

I feel that anyone that wants to start breeding should first visit some shelters, rescues to see how many dogs end up there :( I recently found this organization on FB "German Shepherds on Death Row" and it's absolutely heartbreaking. https://www.facebook.com/savinggsds

LaRen616 04-22-2014 10:30 AM

If you are serious about becoming a breeder (even breeding 1 time means you are a breeder) then you need to start working or showing your dog and get your dog titled. Do all the proper health testing (hips/elbows/etc) and find a reputable breeder in your area that will tell you if your GSD is of breeding quality. If your dog is a good representation of the breed then hopefully the reputable breeder will take you under his/her wing and teach you all he/she knows about bloodlines, correct breed temperment, correct breed structure and whelping a litter.

Freestep 04-22-2014 11:24 AM

Where's the "should I breed my dog" flowchart?


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