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Timsar 05-20-2014 09:23 AM

Question about 9 week old puppies
 
I've heard that an unpleasant/potentially scary event can have a long lasting affect on puppies that are 8 to 10 week old. And for that reason its best to keep them away from large public places or too much contact with other dogs.

First is that correct?
Then, what are some common examples of such events? Does that mean that when I get my puppy (at 8 weeks old) I should try to keep him home and with not much contact with other dogs/people?

Liesje 05-20-2014 09:47 AM

Temperament is genetic, IMO, so if you've got a nice puppy from sound parents it's not a problem. I mean, I would not purposely be putting a 9 week old puppy in front of an M-80 going off or something like that, just use common sense. I find they are very social at this age and like them to experience as much as possible.

Shade 05-20-2014 09:55 AM

Each puppy is different, some puppies are ready to roll right off the bat while others need a bit to acclimitize. It really does come down to genetics as Lies has already mentioned.

Personally I take the pup out everywhere, getting them used to car rides, meeting dogs that I know are safe, and just learning what life is. If the pup is hesitant then we slow down, if they're charging forward and ready to rock then we continue on.

My only worry is diseases so anywhere where dogs frequent I carry the pup so they can see/smell/hear everything but from a safer distance. Once the shots are completed I take away all restrictions and just watch the pup and step in if needed if they're uncomfortable with something.

LoveEcho 05-20-2014 10:20 AM

I have dogs from two different ends of the spectrum- a poorly bred, weak-nerved dog who was easily traumatized, and a very well-bred, strong nerved dog who short of something very extreme is unflappable. I think it depends greatly on the type of dog you have- I wish I had sheltered my weak-nerved male a little more (there's a thread floating around on "rethinking early socialization" that's a good one). My female I don't worry about for a second and want to expose her to everything I can.

SuperG 05-20-2014 11:10 AM

Shade's reply regarding keeping your pup away from potential disease (parvo) until they have all their shots is wise....forget the PetSmarts and PetCos...dog parks etc...any of those places where many dogs have been that you have no idea about...Carrying the pup at times is a good idea through these areas if you must....including the vet office....who knows what has been there prior to your appointment....I always shoot for the earliest appointment, assuming the vet's office is the cleanest and sterile in the morning. I'd even go as far as asking any friends or visitors who might frequent these hotbeds for potential parvo sites to take their shoes off outside the front door when they come to visit your pup. By no means would I isolate the pup for fear of contracting a disease while they are vulnerable as a pup but just minimize the exposure using common sense.

As far as events which might spook the pup, you will inevitably cross that bridge. Perhaps it might simply be a leaf or something else in your yard which is moved by the wind...the pup gets to experience many things for the first time...I'd observe how your pup reacts and see if the initial reaction your pup has is then followed by a measured curiosity to reengage the object....if not and the pup acts scared, I would not coddle the pup and do all the "it's okay" and give the pup a ton of attention. I'd simply lead by example and let the pup engage the object without pushing the dog. Dogs react differently to the same things at times...thunderstorms would be a good example..pots and pans clanging...fireworks during July..etc. I think the first times you notice a negative reaction...take your time..keep your calm...no coddling...and be a leader via your actions which displays to the pup there is nothing to be concerned about and treat the dog via praise or food when they reengage something which may have spooked them a bit the first time around.

Oh, getting a pup used to the doorbell and knocks on the door is a good idea from when they are young...and getting them used to it doesn't mean having them lose their marbles when the doorbell rings.

Enjoy the new furry friend,

SuperG

Baillif 05-20-2014 12:15 PM

You can support the puppy if you wish but its best to be rather matter of fact about the scary stuff. Dog attacks at that age can lead to reactivity or life long phobias for the dog regardless of how strong the temperament js so avoid that kind of thing at a young age at all costs.

Diesel7602 05-20-2014 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Timsar (Post 5540770)
I've heard that an unpleasant/potentially scary event can have a long lasting affect on puppies that are 8 to 10 week old. And for that reason its best to keep them away from large public places or too much contact with other dogs.

First is that correct?
Then, what are some common examples of such events? Does that mean that when I get my puppy (at 8 weeks old) I should try to keep him home and with not much contact with other dogs/people?

This might help
http://www.german-shepherd-us.com/ge...alization.html

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