German Shepherd Dog Forums

German Shepherd Dog Forums (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/)
-   General Puppy Stuff (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/general-puppy-stuff/)
-   -   Neutering...when? (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/general-puppy-stuff/393426-neutering-when.html)

3dognite 01-08-2014 11:48 PM

Neutering...when?
 
It's been 10 years since the last puppy. What are recent time recommendations on when to neuter? My last one I had done as early as the vet would do it, around 6 months.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App

doggiedad 01-08-2014 11:50 PM

why do you want to have your dog neutered? i've never neutered
my dogs?

trcy 01-08-2014 11:56 PM

I was told by the breeder 18 months if you want the dog neutered.

Vets will say as early as possible and really push for no later than 6 months. I'm happy my new vet understands why I'm waiting.

I also saw a reproduction specialist vet. She said for my dog between 12 and 18 months. He has one testicle that did not descend. She also gave the option to remove the one that is still inside, give him a vasectomy and allow him to keep the one that is down. He should not breed. We're still deciding on what course to take.

selzer 01-09-2014 12:12 AM

It really depends on the circumstances and why you want to neuter the dog.

For example, if you have an intact female or two and another intact male of another breed, and three of their young adult mixed breed female offspring who are all intact as well, then you will want to neuter the boy, now, at 8 weeks. (Sorry, that was the scenario of some guy that got himself killed by his dogs getting into a fight and he and his wife were attacked trying to separate them.)

Really though, it does depend on the situation and the reason. If your reason for neutering is to prevent your dog from roaming the neighborhood in search of females to impregnate, go ahead and neuter at six months. Chances are slim that he can reproduce before them. This is a containment issue more than a hormone issue, but if females in heat are anywhere in the neighborhood an amorous young male may be more than ready to find a way out of the yard. Frankly, keeping a GSD at home and safe ought to be a priority regardless to whether or not he is intact.

If the reason for neutering is that young males might mark or hump or become pushy or stubborn in training -- most of these are training issues, but neutering may be helpful. Waiting for the growth plates to close is the best bet. Usually 12 to 18 months is fine. But lots of dogs are neutered younger, when they suddenly become teenagers. The butthead stage claims many a young dog's hormones.

If you want to neuter for health reasons, wait for him to be fully mature 2-3 years, or don't neuter at all -- far more healthy.

TheJakel 01-09-2014 12:21 AM

What selzer says pretty much sums up a long discussion I had with my vet prior to purchasing my dog.

My vet also published a paper on a study he did involving dogs who had been neutered prior to 6 months having a very high likelyhood of acl injuires.

He recommoneded if I were to consider neutering that it wouldn't be until after 3 years old.

Cassidy's Mom 01-09-2014 02:11 AM

Plenty of reading material on the subject here. :) Search results: Neutering

3dognite 01-09-2014 11:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by selzer (Post 4799098)
It really depends on the circumstances and why you want to neuter the dog.

For example, if you have an intact female or two and another intact male of another breed, and three of their young adult mixed breed female offspring who are all intact as well, then you will want to neuter the boy, now, at 8 weeks. (Sorry, that was the scenario of some guy that got himself killed by his dogs getting into a fight and he and his wife were attacked trying to separate them.)

Really though, it does depend on the situation and the reason. If your reason for neutering is to prevent your dog from roaming the neighborhood in search of females to impregnate, go ahead and neuter at six months. Chances are slim that he can reproduce before them. This is a containment issue more than a hormone issue, but if females in heat are anywhere in the neighborhood an amorous young male may be more than ready to find a way out of the yard. Frankly, keeping a GSD at home and safe ought to be a priority regardless to whether or not he is intact.

If the reason for neutering is that young males might mark or hump or become pushy or stubborn in training -- most of these are training issues, but neutering may be helpful. Waiting for the growth plates to close is the best bet. Usually 12 to 18 months is fine. But lots of dogs are neutered younger, when they suddenly become teenagers. The butthead stage claims many a young dog's hormones.

If you want to neuter for health reasons, wait for him to be fully mature 2-3 years, or don't neuter at all -- far more healthy.

So there are a number of reasons that you touched on that I agree with. I live in a semi rural area with neighbors who not only don't contain their dogs but don't spay, continue to get more dogs and cats as the old ones run off, get hit by cars or killed by bears, mountain lions or other animals.

We have a great fence of about 1 & 1/2 acres for the dogs but I've never found a truly escape proof fence either.

I don't want to breed him, I have no interest in showing him and quite frankly almost every intact male dog I've been around is obnoxious and bugs the crap out of me with the marking, humping and generally over the top behavior. And yet I prefer neutered male dogs to female dogs whether spayed or not.

Growth plates...tell about how neutering can affect that please?


Sent from Petguide.com Free App

3dognite 01-09-2014 11:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cassidy's Mom (Post 4799218)
Plenty of reading material on the subject here. :) Search results: Neutering

Sorry I'm on my mobile and couldn't figure out the search on the app.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App

TheJakel 01-09-2014 11:22 PM

I have limited biological knowledge and have only gathered what i can briefly explain from a few different readings but..

Growth plates, joint development and tendon strength of growing and fully developed dogs are generated by the hormones that the dogs body is creating. Neutering or spayed dogs that are done prior to 6 months, old at the very earliest, inhibits the creation and secreation of said hormones and therefore stunts the growth of those dogs. I also believe there are certain characteristics that, from an early spay or neuter will also inhibit brain and cognitvie development.

The humping, marking and over the top behavior are largely training issues.

mcdanfam 01-09-2014 11:34 PM

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites...lth-risks.aspx

A link that helped us decide....our vet watched and share some of the same concerns...seems there are more concerns than these but our political system being what it is...special interest groups....get to push their preferences and ideas...while others pay for their closed minded ideas...instead of finding other options that could benefit everyone and possibly prevent illness. Definitely think people should be questioning it more than they do.

Good luck with your decision.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:38 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2