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Old 12-19-2012, 12:02 PM   #21 (permalink)
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okay then Passionate - Frustrated vet
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Old 12-19-2012, 12:07 PM   #22 (permalink)
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What is the definition of sexual maturity? I am sure that WD at 10 months old is happy to breed any female who wants to.
Regarding females: isn't this at their first heat? I raised a foster litter from a dog that was bred on her first heat, resulting in 10 vigorous pups.
One could define puberty as sexual maturity, yes.
Since m/f dogs can reproduce at under 12 mos., yes.
Even younger in cats, btw. I have seen more than one kitten with baby teeth getting ready to have kittens herself.
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Old 12-19-2012, 12:10 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Thank you all for your responses!
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Old 12-19-2012, 12:14 PM   #24 (permalink)
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The age is what is being questioned. The dog has had so many other things to contend with - including vaccinations, "treatments" , food adjustments, and the ongoing physical growth .
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Old 12-19-2012, 12:15 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Based on what I've read (I'm not an expert). I intend to neuter my dog at 3 years so that he will fully and naturally develop.
If it were a girl I'd worry more about breast cancer and have her fixed as early as is appropriate.


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Old 12-19-2012, 12:38 PM   #26 (permalink)
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None of the health statistics are a guarantee. Most of them say something like, the instance of cancer X is 2.45% higher in intact dogs than in speutered dogs, with a 5% p-value. The only statistic I do trust is that neutered dogs have a 100% less chance of getting testicular cancer and spayed bitches have a 100% less chance of getting ovarian cancer. Those two...I'll hop on board with, everything else has not been proven in any laboratory to actually CAUSE a cancer.

The majority of dogs in the United States are speutered. They live long, healthy lives. If one does come down with cancer, there is absolutely no way of proving that it was caused by an early spay or neuter.

In my opinion...if you're coming onto this forum, and asking a bunch of strangers for speutering advice, you're not ready to handle an intact animal. This isn't anything against OP, its against every single person that has done this over the last two years. Listen to your vet, or breeder, or other people you know and trust. At the end of the day, a normal pet owner (dog parker, not hardcore obedience trainer, ect) will have a much harder time with an intact animal. In my opinion, for most people, the joy of owning said dog will decrease by way more than that statistic about cancer x or cancer y.

It also takes away from the possibility of at 18 months someone with another GSD coming to that person and saying, "we have two beautiful dogs, they have amazing temperaments, we should breed them and make thousands of dollars." And the person with that dog actually thinking about it. I know we all hope that people wouldnt do that, but when you can get $500 a puppy or more, 10 puppies are a nice little paycheck for a few months of work and a little extra dog food.
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Old 12-19-2012, 12:38 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Since m/f dogs can reproduce at under 12 mos., yes.
Even younger in cats, btw. I have seen more than one kitten with baby teeth getting ready to have kittens herself.
I know it is kinda off topic but pet mice are even worse. I have seen nursing males court their baby sisters and aunties!!
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Old 12-19-2012, 12:39 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Based on what I've read (I'm not an expert). I intend to neuter my dog at 3 years so that he will fully and naturally develop.
If you have made it this far, why neuter him anyways?
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Old 12-19-2012, 12:43 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Human cancers have nothing to do with dog cancers.
Here is a little "friendly" challenge to this quote then I am done w/the subject

Endogenous Gonadal Hormone Exposure and Bone Sarcoma Risk

Endogenous Gonadal Hormone Exposure and Bone Sarcoma Risk

Spontaneous osteosarcoma in pet dogs closely mimics its human counterpart in terms of skeletal location, metaphyseal involvement, aggressive biological behavior, high propensity for pulmonary metastases, and response to cytotoxic chemotherapy (13, 14, 15) . An estimated 10,000 cases of bone sarcoma in pet dogs are diagnosed annually in the United States

Humans do not frequently undergo gonadectomy. In contrast, pet dogs frequently undergo elective gonadectomy, providing a unique population to study the influence of endogenous sex hormones on spontaneous bone sarcoma development. Data collected from veterinary teaching hospitals suggested that both male and female neutered dogs were at increased risk for bone sarcoma

To test the hypothesis that endogenous sex hormones significantly influence bone sarcomagenesis, we conducted a historical cohort study of Rottweiler dogs, a breed known to be at high risk for bone sarcoma. In addition, we determined whether adult height or body weight were significant risk factors for bone sarcoma between individuals of the same breed. Our results indicate that dogs undergoing early gonadectomy have a significantly higher risk of appendicular bone sarcoma, suggesting that sex hormones may be important modifiers of bone sarcoma development.
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Old 12-19-2012, 01:16 PM   #30 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by martemchik View Post
None of the health statistics are a guarantee. Most of them say something like, the instance of cancer X is 2.45% higher in intact dogs than in speutered dogs, with a 5% p-value. The only statistic I do trust is that neutered dogs have a 100% less chance of getting testicular cancer and spayed bitches have a 100% less chance of getting ovarian cancer. Those two...I'll hop on board with, everything else has not been proven in any laboratory to actually CAUSE a cancer.

The majority of dogs in the United States are speutered. They live long, healthy lives. If one does come down with cancer, there is absolutely no way of proving that it was caused by an early spay or neuter.
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