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Patrolman424 05-08-2014 11:12 PM

chain link fence question
 
I am installing a six foot tall chain link fence in my backyard for my large German Shepherds. I have an installer that is going to give me a good deal on some industrial strength fence with twisted top and bottom. It is much thicker and sturdier that regular chain link. I was thinking that the twisted end on the bottom would prevent the dogs from trying to get under the fence to escape. I would also have it installed so the bottom is basically touching the ground, which would help it not move. Has anyone ever had a twisted bottom chain link fence for their dogs and how did it work for you? My only concern would be the dog getting his foot cut on the bottom if he was trying to dig out. I guess he would probably only try it once though. Any thoughts?

Patrolman424 05-08-2014 11:18 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Here is a pic of what I'm talking about.

selzer 05-08-2014 11:31 PM

Yeah, well I worry about collars getting caught and dogs getting hung up, scratched up, infected.

One thing that has worked for me is installing a visible, solar powered electric fence wire about 18 inches up from the bottom of the fence. Keeps the dogs from climbing or digging. And it worked, my girls would charge, put on the breaks and look for where that wire was and then stay far enough away to not get hit. Never got out of my fence.

I don't have that anymore, because my dogs are kenneled in my back yard in secure kennels when I am not home and the yard where the kennels are is fenced around. This keeps my dogs safe. I let them in the yard only when I am there, and they never bother my fences.

SummerGSDLover 05-09-2014 12:02 AM

I think it sounds ok but I wouldst leave collars on the dogs when unsupervised. I love selzers idea about the mini fence 18" up.

*-*Summer*-*

middleofnowhere 05-09-2014 01:05 AM

I wouldn't do it. I'd do regular chain link. That's what I used in Arkansas coupled with privacy fencing. I did not leave my dogs out when I was not home if that matters.

LeoRose 05-09-2014 01:52 AM

Ilka, my mutt, has scraped herself up on her belly and inner thighs from going over my 6' tall chain link fence, but nothing serious. Needless to say, since she's now a confirmed fence jumper/climber, I don't leave her outside alone. She always has to have "adult supervision".

Make sure the installer runs a tension wire at the bottom, to keep them from pushing it out.


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kr16 05-09-2014 09:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Patrolman424 (Post 5494370)
I am installing a six foot tall chain link fence in my backyard for my large German Shepherds. I have an installer that is going to give me a good deal on some industrial strength fence with twisted top and bottom. It is much thicker and sturdier that regular chain link. I was thinking that the twisted end on the bottom would prevent the dogs from trying to get under the fence to escape. I would also have it installed so the bottom is basically touching the ground, which would help it not move. Has anyone ever had a twisted bottom chain link fence for their dogs and how did it work for you? My only concern would be the dog getting his foot cut on the bottom if he was trying to dig out. I guess he would probably only try it once though. Any thoughts?


Get the regular one, than buy the 4x4 long outdoor wood, like railroad ties, they have at home depot. You put it down on the outside of the fence and it will help. On the inside you get 12x12 square pavers and place them all along the inside. That is what I have had for years. than again I never leave my dogs unsupervised.

McCoy 05-09-2014 10:04 AM

Before you do this, just make sure that the installer knows what they are doing. Putting up chain link isnt rocket science, but there is a skill to it.

The fact that nobody has mentioned the tension wire (until now) worries me. Yes you need a tension wire properly installed. The twisted bottom will not stop a motivated dog from getting out.The dog will gladly risk a few scrapes to get out if he wants out bad enough.

My opinion is that the fence offers some security, but mains acts as a visual boundary. Meaning, once the fence is up, you have to teach him that he isnt allowed to touch the fence.

In addition, expect him to test the fence once its up. He will investigate it for weak spots.

HOBY 05-09-2014 12:34 PM

I have a 20' X 40' X 6' chain link fence pen with an earth floor. All sharp ends were hammered over. At the gate opening I poured concrete in the ground 8" W X 18" D X the width of the opening. I buried plastic covered garden fencing straight down in the ground at the bottom of the fence and wire tied the two fences together. I have had fence climbers and diggers. I never leave a collar on my dogs while alone in the pen. The best thing I ever did was to enclose my deck which runs the length of my home. Not one of my dogs ever tried to escape from my deck including my diggers and climbers. The closer they are to you the more content they are. I use the pen every day just for a change of pace and for training. I keep some home made agility pieces in there. The dog can't wait to get in his pen.

sehrgutcsg 05-09-2014 01:07 PM

I have built dog runs before and I think I can offer some advice.

Around the perimeter of the dog run you need to dig a trench about 10 inches deep and 10 inches wide. You need to fill that trench with concrete. This is the flooting where the dog would be able to dig it's way out if you were trying to keep the dog in.

As far as sharp objects on the bottom I would stay away from that. I would have the chain link coming down within a half of an inch to the concrete footing with the loop ends pointed up.

If the animal tries to dig and runs in the concrete the animal change its mind and just stop it's pretty much a given. It's an upside down curb.

The gate is another important factor it's best to have a vestibule - a staging area where a double gated with double latches so that if one door is opened accidentally the other door will catch the escapee, so that would be in the shape of a U-shaped vestibule.

I know it sounds like a lot of work but something like this will last 25 to 40 years. I want to wish you the best of luck it's a lot of work..


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