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Old 02-06-2011, 10:06 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Prehistoric Cemetery Reveals Man and Fox Were Pals

Before dog was man's best friend, we might have kept foxes as pets, even bringing them with us into our graves, scientists now say.
This discovery, made in a prehistoric cemetery in the Middle East, could shed light on the nature and timing of newly developing relationships between people and beasts before animals were first domesticated. It also hints that key aspects of ancient practices surrounding death might have originated earlier than before thought.

The ancient graveyard known as 'Uyun al-Hammam, or "spring of the pigeon," was discovered in the small river valley of Wadi Ziqlab in northern Jordan in 2000 and named after a nearby freshwater spring. The burial ground is about 16,500 years old, meaning it dates back to just before the emergence of the Natufian culture, in which pioneers used wild cereals (such as wheat, barley and oats) in a practice that would eventually evolve into true farming. These communities dwelled 11,600 to 14,500 years ago in the Levant, the area that today includes Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria.

The Natufian culture was known to bury people with dogs. One case discovered in past excavations in the area involved a woman buried with her hand on a puppy, while another included three humans buried with two dogs along with tortoise shells. However, the new discovery at 'Uyun al-Hammam shows that some of these practices took place earlier with a different doglike animal, the fox.

At least 11 people were buried at the site in Jordan, most of whom were found with artifacts such as [COLOR=#366388 !important][COLOR=#366388 !important]stone [COLOR=#366388 !important]tools[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR], a bone spoon and bone dagger, and red ochre, an iron mineral. One grave held the skull and upper right arm bone of a red fox, with red ochre stuck on its skull, along with bones of deer, gazelle, tortoises and wild cattle. A neighboring grave with human remains also contained the nearly complete skeleton of a red fox, missing its skull and upper right arm bone, suggesting that a single fox had parts of it moved from one grave to another in prehistoric times.

"What we appear to have found is a case where a fox was killed and buried with its owner," said researcher Lisa Maher, a prehistoric archaeologist at the University of Cambridge in England. "Later, the grave was reopened for some reason and the human's body was moved, but because the link between the fox and the human had been significant, the fox was moved as well."

The fact that the fox was reburied with the human could mean the animal was once seen as a companion. The researchers suggest its bones may have been moved so the dead person would continue to have the fox as a comrade in the afterlife.

"The fox was treated in a special way from any other animals at the site," Maher told LiveScience. "We think that this represents a significant social relationship, something that clearly goes far beyond the domestication of animals as livestock."

Although foxes are relatively easy to tame, domesticating them might have failed because of their skittish and timid nature. This might explain why dogs ultimately achieved "man's best friend" status instead. However, fox symbolism and fox remains are quite common in later Stone Age sites, both in domestic and burial contexts, "so even when other animals were domesticated, prehistoric people maintained an interest in the fox," Maher said.

The graves at the Jordan site do contain the remains of other kinds of animals, so "we can only take the fox-dog analogy so far," said researcher Edward Banning at the University of Toronto.

The notion that foxes served as pets happens to fit with modern preconceptions about human-dog relationships, and is just one possible explanation among many - for instance, it could have had some spiritual meaning instead, Maher said. Also, foxes did not always receive special treatment - other fox bones at the site bore signs of butchery and cooking, suggesting they were eaten for meat.

In any case, the findings reveal these [COLOR=#366388 !important][COLOR=#366388 !important]burial [COLOR=#366388 !important]practices[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR] and even the use of cemeteries go back further in time than previously thought.

"The repeated use of a particular location for the burial of the dead suggests that the people had a special connection to this site," Maher said. "Perhaps having a nearby place to return to and visit your ancestors or loved ones was as important in prehistory as it is in many cultures today."

The scientists detailed their findings in the Jan. 26 issue of the journal PLoS ONE.
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Old 02-06-2011, 10:16 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I've always wanted a fox!
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Old 02-06-2011, 10:30 AM   #3 (permalink)
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My aunt got a fox once... Didn't end up well, thing was vicious and nasty, they're NOT pets!
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Old 02-06-2011, 10:38 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I knew a guy that had a pet fox and the fox was very nice. I'm sure just like all animals, they have different personalities.
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Old 02-06-2011, 10:40 AM   #5 (permalink)
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My cousin has a Shiba Inu, looks a little bit like a fox, and thinks a little bit like a cat.
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Old 02-06-2011, 10:43 AM   #6 (permalink)
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It's Shiba Inu, and yes, they are quite cat like.

Sorry, I just don't like the idea of a fox as a pet. Your friend was probably well read on foxes and raised his properly, but a lot of people don't even research their dogs before they get them, let alone train or socialize well, someone thinking it'd be cool to have a fox without looking into it further like my aunt is flirting with disaster.
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Old 02-06-2011, 10:49 AM   #7 (permalink)
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I think you read wayyyyy to much into my post. I did not say I was GOING to get a fox and I'm not going to sit around arguing with you about it.
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Old 02-06-2011, 11:02 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Who's arguing? I know you didn't say that, I'm just saying in general. Sorry, I'm not having the best day, if you haven't seen my other posts.
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Old 02-06-2011, 11:55 AM   #9 (permalink)
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There are now domesticated foxes
Sibfox – Tame Fox - domesticated fox bred in Russia, available in USA from SibFox, Inc.
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Old 02-06-2011, 12:05 PM   #10 (permalink)
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YES Thank you I was wracking my BRAIN trying to remember where that place was! I saw it on TV not long ago and wanted to post it here when I remembered it, but couldn't for the life of me recall where it was! About the scientist who did an experiment trying to domesticate them using human interaction on some of them from day one and then only breeding the friendliest of those, while the isolated ones retain the wild nature, very interesting. They end up with so many that they sell them as pets. And it's so interesting too if you notice, the colors of the domesticated ones changed like that pretty much on their own as the breeding progressed, it's fascinating research.
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