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Old 08-04-2014, 11:27 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Question GSD and a pug

So I have a 4/5 month old GSD and a 6 year old pug.

When we first got the GSD he was 9 weeks old, and he and my pug played together happily. But now the GSD is older and much bigger! He still tries to play with the pug, but the pug doesn't want it anymore (assuming because the GSD is twice is his size now).

Anywho, the GSD will chew on my pugs legs/tail/neck, which leads the pug to run away. The GSD then chases the pug and continues the chewing. After 15 seconds or so of this the pug starts to snap and growl at the GSD. The GSD will back off for a few seconds and then go right back to chewing at him while making playful noises, but I end up stepping in and pulling the GSD away and give him something else to do.

But this is starting to become a pain in the butt because everytime the pug jumps off the couch or runs around the GSD starts chasing and chewing on him, he even likes to stand over/trample the pug and sometimes put his massive mouth around the back of the pugs neck.

The GSD is an unneutered male and the pug is a neutered male. It seems like the behavior is standard puppy behavior, but I'm not sure. Some things I have read said to let the older dog snap at him to put the younger dog in his place, but when my pug tries to do this the GSD thinks he is playing (probably cause the pug is tiny).

Long story short: GSD chews on pug; after a while pug gets mad and snaps at GSD; GSD thinks pug is playing and continues to trample pug into the dust

what should I do?
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Old 08-04-2014, 11:37 PM   #2 (permalink)
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I have a similar problem, except with my cat. I have a 1 yr old female who loves the kitties but doesn't know when to stop; even when the cat bites her on the ear or leg and makes her yelp. We haven't really done much about it other than telling her leave it and making her settle when it gets to rambunctious.

On a side note, she got her feelings hurt this past weekend bc she tried to make friends w the in-laws cats and she got hissed at and swatted, with claws most likely. She spent the rest of the weekend frustrated and whining bc she wanted to play with them but was afraid. There was a cat between her and I and I called her to me and as she skirted past the cat she yelped like the cat got her, which she didn't lol.
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Old 08-04-2014, 11:53 PM   #3 (permalink)
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I have a similar problem, except with my cat. I have a 1 yr old female who loves the kitties but doesn't know when to stop; even when the cat bites her on the ear or leg and makes her yelp. We haven't really done much about it other than telling her leave it and making her settle when it gets to rambunctious.
LOL, mine does the same thing. He's been swatted a few times after he decided to chew on my cats tail, but other than that they seem to get along fine. The cat even lets my GSD lick his face!
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Old 08-05-2014, 07:36 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Long story short: GSD chews on pug; after a while pug gets mad and snaps at GSD; GSD thinks pug is playing and continues to trample pug into the dust

what should I do?
My boy does the same thing, but with anything smaller than him.
I have a friend who has a pug, same situation when bob was a baby Otis was fine with him but now that he literally towers over him its a different story.
Otis puts up with it for awhile, but of course my friends think Bob is trying to eat him.... My new rule is... If you don't want my dog to play with your dog.. don't bring it to my house....
I am also hoping someone has some suggestions other than me having to follow him around with a spray bottle.

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Old 08-05-2014, 08:43 AM   #5 (permalink)
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I have a strict - MY house MY rules policy

Playing is fine only when both parties are having fun, if one oversteps then they get put in immediate time out and all fun ceases. They learn pretty quick what play is allowed and what isn't.

If the pup is being a butthead and ignoring the signs (Delgado would do this too) then it was up to me to set the rules straight. Now if Jazzy or the cats have had enough they come to me and I intervene. If your pug growls thatís YOUR sign to step in and separate.

Something else to consider is he is obviously using the pug for his own enjoyment. Keep treats and toys on you at all times and show him that YOU are much better and more fun than anything else in the world. If he wants to play then be available for him to play with, soon he'll be looking to you and not the other dog for play time
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Old 08-06-2014, 01:52 PM   #6 (permalink)
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if one oversteps then they get put in immediate time out and all fun ceases. They learn pretty quick what play is allowed and what isn't.
hmm, ok I'll try that. How long should the timeout be?
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Old 08-06-2014, 02:03 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by danielisamazing View Post

Long story short: GSD chews on pug; after a while pug gets mad and snaps at GSD; GSD thinks pug is playing and continues to trample pug into the dust

what should I do?
Be aware that your pup KNOWS the Pug isn't playing. Your pup is being disrespectful to the Pug because your pup figured out it can without any adverse reactions from anyone in the household.

Stop the behavior before it starts. Don't allow your pup to chew on the Pug.

One day, in the not too distant future, your GSD will be chewing on your Pug and your Pug will react negatively and your GSD will seriously hurt him.
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Old 08-06-2014, 02:43 PM   #8 (permalink)
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hmm, ok I'll try that. How long should the timeout be?
Depends on the dog. Some dogs only need 5-10 seconds, I found with Delgado he needed 5 minutes or more. Time out means whatever they are doing in that very second stops and they are moved away.

Some time outs meant being on a leash and lying at my feet quietly, some time outs meant being sent out of the room, and others meant being crated and left alone. Personally it depends on the severity of the crime - if the dog is just being a brat - sending them out of the room can work. If the dog warrants a scolding then either the crate or leash is best


The point is to let the dog know exactly what they did wrong, that takes timing and being present and supervising. So the instant the pug yelps or you feel that the GSD stepped over the line immediately mark the behaviour with a negative (noise is fastest so a loud clap or HEY!) and he gets physically moved. The dog will very quickly learn which actions get him scolded and removed.
You do need to balance punishment and reward. Engage the pup as much as possible and reward things like eye contact and play often. As the dog progresses and you start seeing him play gentler or even avoiding the pug then reward that as well. Also be fair, if the pug is egging the GSD on or otherwise being a brat then the pug must be scolded as well.

If you can't supervise closely then I would leash the GSD to a person, crate, or use baby gates to separate. The GSD's behaviour needs to stop NOW or as Nancy has already mentioned things are going to start getting ugly.


I hope that helps
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Jasmine - Female Miniature Poodle - born Aug 15, 2010
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Alex - Male Cocker Spaniel (rescue) - RIP Cuddlebug 2007-2010
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Old 08-06-2014, 07:41 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Shade View Post
Depends on the dog. Some dogs only need 5-10 seconds, I found with Delgado he needed 5 minutes or more. Time out means whatever they are doing in that very second stops and they are moved away.

Some time outs meant being on a leash and lying at my feet quietly, some time outs meant being sent out of the room, and others meant being crated and left alone. Personally it depends on the severity of the crime - if the dog is just being a brat - sending them out of the room can work. If the dog warrants a scolding then either the crate or leash is best


The point is to let the dog know exactly what they did wrong, that takes timing and being present and supervising. So the instant the pug yelps or you feel that the GSD stepped over the line immediately mark the behaviour with a negative (noise is fastest so a loud clap or HEY!) and he gets physically moved. The dog will very quickly learn which actions get him scolded and removed.
You do need to balance punishment and reward. Engage the pup as much as possible and reward things like eye contact and play often. As the dog progresses and you start seeing him play gentler or even avoiding the pug then reward that as well. Also be fair, if the pug is egging the GSD on or otherwise being a brat then the pug must be scolded as well.

If you can't supervise closely then I would leash the GSD to a person, crate, or use baby gates to separate. The GSD's behaviour needs to stop NOW or as Nancy has already mentioned things are going to start getting ugly.


I hope that helps

This is super helpful! We have a similar situation at our house with a boston/pug mix. I'll be trying your method starting now. Thank you! I'm feeling optimistic!
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Old 08-06-2014, 08:00 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Vicky does the same with my old new golden retriever puppy that is 4 weeks old!!
I just had to give the retriver to my neighbors but to make Vicky stop I had to shout saying none sense lol, but she understood the loud volume means a bad warning she stops for a while then does it. I was scared for the retriver so I gave her away didn't try the shouting thing except once or twice but you should try it but getting your GsD a toy that distracts him will be good , or buy a toy that has the smell of chicken/meat , or if you have time take your GsD for a huge run and never stop until he is too tired and needs a rest maybe the pug might come and attack him and your Gs will be scared which makes it worse :/ that's why getting a large breed and a tiny breed is sometimes a very bad idea, guess you might need a special trainer's advice for that
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