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-   -   "Hides" upstairs (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/general-behavior/468961-hides-upstairs.html)

FoxyMom 07-09-2014 11:06 PM

"Hides" upstairs
 
We have a 19 month old male GSD. He has recently began going upstairs every time my daughter (who is 10) raises her voice in any way. He will come down if we call him, and seems fine, but will soon return upstairs. This usually happens at night.

The only thing that has changed, is fireworks! The first time he exhibited this behavior was after the first night people set fireworks off on our street.

I'm not sure what to do. Do I let him stay upstairs? Do I force him to come back down and make him stay with us? We are working on getting our daughter to control her tone, but when she's excited, she has a hard time containing it. And to be honest, it kind of hurts her feeling that her dog hides after something she's done.

Suggestions? TIA!

Chip18 07-09-2014 11:30 PM

I have seen this behaviour in "Shiloh’s" on an episode of "Bad Dogs" ..owner would raise there voice the dog would go upstairs into the bathroom and slam the door?? The first dog taught a second dog the same behaviour!


Anyway...this might prove beneficial to the dog and your daughter:
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum...ing-dog-4.html

FoxyMom 07-10-2014 12:25 PM

We have used tethering in the past. Perhaps we can try this in the evenings so when something arises he doesn't have the option to go upstairs. I just didn't know if keeping him where he is obviously uncomfortable would be counterproductive. However, keeping him downstairs even after she has raised her voice may show him there is nothing to be scared of. I also thought that perhaps we could make her raised voice a pleasurable thing. She could use her voice while playing ball with him. Thoughts?

Mary Beth 07-10-2014 09:14 PM

I would try your idea of having your daughter raise her voice when she is playing ball with him. I wouldn't do the tethering or force him to be downstairs when he is frightened. It could be an unfortunate combination of the fireworks and your daughter's voice especially since that is when it started and also he is doing this at night.

FoxyMom 07-10-2014 10:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mary Beth (Post 5758994)
I would try your idea of having your daughter raise her voice when she is playing ball with him. I wouldn't do the tethering or force him to be downstairs when he is frightened. It could be an unfortunate combination of the fireworks and your daughter's voice especially since that is when it started and also he is doing this at night.

That's what I was thinking. Thank you!

Chip18 07-11-2014 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FoxyMom (Post 5756937)
We have used tethering in the past. Perhaps we can try this in the evenings so when something arises he doesn't have the option to go upstairs. I just didn't know if keeping him where he is obviously uncomfortable would be counterproductive. However, keeping him downstairs even after she has raised her voice may show him there is nothing to be scared of. I also thought that perhaps we could make her raised voice a pleasurable thing. She could use her voice while playing ball with him. Thoughts?

Nope not really tethering, the link to the article is in the thread but here:

Wheres my sanity: Sit on the Dog, aka: The long down

sunsets 07-13-2014 11:16 PM

Hmm, I'm also interested in the replies. Our guy, a middle-aged adult, has a tendancy to slink out of the house when voices are raised. Especially if my husband is shouting at a game on TV.

He's got a dog door and a fenced in back garden with a doghouse to hide in, so I guess that's his "safe" space. We can usually coax him back inside, but it does make us feel bad that we scare him like that.

I don't know if there is something in his (unknown) history that makes him behave like that, or if he's just a sensitive soul. It's kind of weird, as he's not a shy dog in public and he certainly will guard the house from strangers.

middleofnowhere 07-14-2014 09:48 AM

Well, perhaps the dog will teach your daughter to moderate her voice? She knows what she does that causes him to react by leaving.

Dog's ears are very sensitive. (so it makes sense that this behavior started after fireworks.)

There are two thoughts I have in response to the dog's behavior: 1. leave the dog alone and don't worry about it or 2. have the daughter use the voice and give a reward to the dog - like a super special treat - at the same time. I'm not sure whether I would do this often or just occassionally and taper off.


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