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-   -   How do I get my 1 year old to stop getting too excited when meeting dogs.... (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/general-behavior/388578-how-do-i-get-my-1-year-old-stop-getting-too-excited-when-meeting-dogs.html)

gsdemack 12-30-2013 10:13 AM

How do I get my 1 year old to stop getting too excited when meeting dogs....
 
I have to hold her back and she pulls and jumps on the lead. It makes my dog look dangerous because it looks aggressive...but she only wants to play.

I never let her play with another dog until she demonstrates calmness, then I put her off the lead for playing. I have let her off while excited in the past but I am very consistent for at least two months now.

David Taggart 12-30-2013 11:01 AM

Pay attention to "Heel" command when you walk, "Sit", "Come" - not to her barks, it will go away with time. When she's still barking but heeling perfectly - do it off leash.

pyratemom 12-30-2013 11:04 AM

You need to practice what we always called the "meet and greet". Get a friend with a dog who is calm, walk toward each other, put dogs in sit, shake hands, walk away. Later, put dogs in sit, shake hands, ask to treat the other dog, treat the other dog while friend treats your dog (only while sitting quietly), then turn and walk away. Eventually the goal is to get your dog to sit quietly while you greet another person with a dog. It takes time - one lady in class called it the "No! Sit!" exercise as she had a wheaten terrier that was not well controlled because she never practiced. LOL! Socialization will help with the "Yay another dog" excitement. This is an exercise ideally taught while they are young but can work with an older dog - it just takes a little more work and strength. A Gentle Leader head collar may help.

Courtney 12-30-2013 11:06 AM

I honestly think you have to work backwards with this. FIRST focus on her ignoring other dogs, no greeting, heeling or walking nice on a loose lead when passing. Keep up your pace when passing other dogs, not giving her the opportunity to stop. When this has been proofed slowly allow her to meet other dogs in a calm sit, stay. This will take time. Right now she's over the top, take a step back. Good luck.

pyratemom 12-30-2013 11:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Courtney (Post 4742930)
I honestly think you have to work backwards with this. FIRST focus on her ignoring other dogs, no greeting, heeling or walking nice on a loose lead when passing. Keep up your pace when passing other dogs, not giving her the opportunity to stop. When this has been proofed slowly allow her to meet other dogs in a calm sit, stay. This will take time. Right now she's over the top, take a step back. Good luck.

I agree, this is a good place to start.

Malika 01-09-2014 08:58 PM

I love the approach, Courtney, but how do you suggest focusing on ignoring other dogs? How does one focus on that? I can't imagine going from where we are to even walking near a friend with a dog. I always increase the distance when I notice her reacting to the distraction, but I live in an urban area where others with dogs seem to come out of the blue (we walk, but runners with dogs are a problem). So, we are often surprised by others.

Anyway, I have sympathy for those struggling in this area. I have a 1year old GSD that I've known since she was 5 weeks. For the last year I have given it all I have and we have setbacks all the time. It's so frustrating to have spent so much time, energy, money, and patience for such mediocre results. Oh well, she's my best friend and a **** good dog anyway.


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