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Old 12-24-2012, 08:42 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Raise a dog to think it can take on the world and...

If this needs to be moved please do.

Introducing the new dog (Heidi) to my other two is proving a bit challenging. Well only challenging with Mina my other GSD. Darcey (pitbull) was easy. Heidi growled at him and he ran into my closet and hid haha. They (Heidi and Darcey)are fine now. Mina and Heidi on the other hand are not working out at all. They have both been brought up to think they can take on the world and win. So put them together and neither one will back off. Both these girls are so confident that it's not like either of them to back down. I love this about them but it is making the introductions hard. I did expect this with the same sex aggression and just knowing these two dogs so it's not overwhelming me. I just wish they could figure it out without hurting each other (no actual fights yet, just lots of growling barking and "snaps"). They are both very obedient and can be doing obedience right next to each other. Once that is over it's game on. So for now they will still be rotating between crates, yard and house.

Any ideas or things you have tried with success to bring to feisty females together? I have a couple more things to try but ang suggestions welcome. I'm going to give it a few more days before I try again. Let them settle a bit more and smell through the crates (they are next to each other) some more.
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Old 12-24-2012, 09:26 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Get muzzles. Keep doing OB together, structured walks together, and off leash walks with one on leash and the other off, then rotate.

In the house when you are working on intros, muzzles need to be worn, along with corrective collars and tabs. Dogs should not fight unless allowed to do so from the leader, so if you say behave they need to. Now of course, they are going to blow you off and try to start something. Which means you need to be right there to redirect and correct. IMO, going after another dog in my house is a HUGE sign of disrespect and is not tolerated.

In between sessions, or when you are not directly supervising, crate and rotate. They will most likely never be trustworthy together without you there, but it is not unrealistic to expect them to behave in your presence.

Good luck!
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Old 12-24-2012, 09:43 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by N Smith View Post
Get muzzles. Keep doing OB together, structured walks together, and off leash walks with one on leash and the other off, then rotate.

In the house when you are working on intros, muzzles need to be worn, along with corrective collars and tabs. Dogs should not fight unless allowed to do so from the leader, so if you say behave they need to. Now of course, they are going to blow you off and try to start something. Which means you need to be right there to redirect and correct. IMO, going after another dog in my house is a HUGE sign of disrespect and is not tolerated.

In between sessions, or when you are not directly supervising, crate and rotate. They will most likely never be trustworthy together without you there, but it is not unrealistic to expect them to behave in your presence.

Good luck!
Thanks! I have been doing most of this already. I appreciate the reasurance. I have not used the correction collars because that just amps them up. Even just pulling back with one and no correction. Both dogs use correction collars for stimulation durring protection work. I only have an agitation muzzle and that thing still hurts so I will get a couple mesh/nylon ones. The one time they actually went for one another once I said to stop they did. So I was very happy the new dog listened after only having her for a couple days.

I don't expect them to be best friends. I would just like it if they can tolerate each other when in the house together. My dogs are crated when left home alone. If they never get along, it's no big deal. I kinda expected that, but I still want to work it and see if possible. Thanks again! I'm not opposed to trying anything.
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Old 12-24-2012, 10:22 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by mycobraracr View Post
Thanks! I have been doing most of this already. I appreciate the reasurance. I have not used the correction collars because that just amps them up. Even just pulling back with one and no correction. Both dogs use correction collars for stimulation durring protection work. I only have an agitation muzzle and that thing still hurts so I will get a couple mesh/nylon ones. The one time they actually went for one another once I said to stop they did. So I was very happy the new dog listened after only having her for a couple days.

I don't expect them to be best friends. I would just like it if they can tolerate each other when in the house together. My dogs are crated when left home alone. If they never get along, it's no big deal. I kinda expected that, but I still want to work it and see if possible. Thanks again! I'm not opposed to trying anything.
I would not use prongs if they have been using them during agitation, instead use a nylon or chain slip lead, you will have to determine if slow upward pressure or leash pops are what is going to deescalate the situation. Also, make sure you are very attuned to body language and correct BEFORE you see an outward display of aggression. Posturing, strong eye contact, elevated tail, hackles, yawning, sniffing, scratching, lip licking, shaking, all can be signals. So be proactive and catch them before you need a high correction and/or physical removal.
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