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Old 12-18-2013, 12:39 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Breeders or Rescues?

People have been adopting more often than buying puppies. I have been hearing more bad stuff about breeders and people appealing more to adopting recently. There is a huge overpopulation of millions homeless dogs dying everyday. I have been putting a lot of thought into breeders (even responsible) and rescues. For a long time always was hoping in the future to get a German shepherd puppy from a real responsible breeder. However, now there is more of a thing of half rescuing German shepherds and the other half wanting a pup from a real responsible breeder and other adopting dogs. I would get a German shepherd from a real responsible breeder and will get some from rescues too. Although if I were to get another dog besides the German shepherd I would always go for adopting. Right now am not ready for another dog, but this breeder and adopting thing has been coming to mind a lot. Even though I like real responsible breeders, for some reason every time I hear somebody say they got their dog from a breeder I wonder why am I feeling a yuck in a gut? Half of the majority is now finding all breeding bad which is biased because there are true real responsible breeders out there solving this homeless dog population thingy. Same goes for rescue organizations, etc. What do you all think about this overpopulation homeless dog and breeder and rescue adopting thing? I am not sure what to think even though I am an animal rights activist. I cannot live without dogs so I can get my 1st German shepherd from a real responsible breeder than go for rescues. Is that a good plan?
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Old 12-18-2013, 03:00 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I have one that I got from a byb and i just got a rescue . If you get a puppy you can mold it into the way you want him or.her to be. Rescue you don't know how they were raised and may have issues

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Old 12-18-2013, 06:34 AM   #3 (permalink)
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I'm not sure I want in on this discussion so I'll just say a couple of things and be on my way. I've done both adoption and purchased from a breeder.

I think this has more to do with your situation than the moral decision. Why are those dogs homeless in the first place? In a lot of cases, their people chose them for the wrong reason and couldn't handle the commitment of a GSD. I don't recommend a rescue for a first time GSD owner. I think the first time owner needs to grow with the dog.

A rescuer of a GSD needs to know how to deal with any behavioral issues in short order. 100lbs of teeth and muscle with a bad attitude in a certain situation could get bad quickly. Look at all the puppy issues posted on the forum. Now add 100 lbs and large teeth to that situation and it dramatically changes the outcome.

My heart goes out to every one of the animals that are currently in shelters. We heavily considered adopting this time. The adoption agencies were the issue for us but that is for another discussion. We have specific needs and wants for this Shepherd so we made the decision to get a pup from a reputable breeder. We don't regret that decision.

Every rescue is going to have issues albeit some only very minor however, you must prepare for the worst. I find it amazing how some dogs just seem to know they have been rescued and show true gratitude. Others, not so much.....

If people quit buying from non-reputable breeders, they would quit breeding.... I say find a very reputable breeder for your fist Shepherd, then consider adopting another about 2 years from now if you think that is what you need to do.
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Old 12-18-2013, 07:02 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I think this has more to do with your situation than the moral decision. Why are those dogs homeless in the first place? In a lot of cases, their people chose them for the wrong reason and couldn't handle the commitment of a GSD. I don't recommend a rescue for a first time GSD owner. I think the first time owner needs to grow with the dog.
I agree with you on the first bit, and was actually coming to say pretty much the same thing, but the second part I disagree a bit. I think you absolutely can have a rescue GSD for your first GSD, but it REALLY needs to be evaluated by a rescue group that is GSD breed specific. Meaning, they are absolute pros at evaluating temperament and getting the right dog in the right home. Just like a good, reputable breeder will help evaluate the right puppy for the situation, a good, reputable rescue will do the same. Moreover, by adopting an adult dog with known temperament, you can even get a dog that already has some obedience and housebreaking under its belt, and you can be past the difficulties of puppy-hood and adolescence. If you're unsure of your handling skills and get a puppy from a breeder, you could possibly BE one of those people that didn't know what they were getting in to, you know what I mean?

At any rate, this whole thing is the same issue I struggled with for years before settling on what I felt was right for us! What it really boiled down to was our goals for our dog. I'm really looking forward to getting involved with SchH, and I want a dog with an absolute rock solid temperament because I have a toddler. It's a really fine balance finding what I want in a rescue (not that I haven't been looking, just in case!) so a breeder just really feels like the right fit. I also have known tons of shepherds with breed specific issues that I really would like to avoid, so going to a breeder that tests and tracks for all those things in their lines will put me at the best possible advantage with that.

So what you really need to do is take a good, objective look at your life, situation, handling skills, etc. Are you looking for just a good dog to fit in with your family, or do you have specific goals in mind? Do you feel comfortable raising a puppy, or would you feel better off with an adult with a known temperament? Do you have a breed specific rescue in your area that you would feel comfortable adopting from?

Good luck with your search! You'll make the right decision in the end.
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Old 12-18-2013, 07:53 AM   #5 (permalink)
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This question is as old as, "which came first: the chicken, or the egg?"

Bottom line, both have pros and cons and it depends wholly on the individual's preferences and life situation. There are crappy rescues out there who place dogs in homes they have no business being in, just as there are stellar rescues who do great evaluations of dogs and work really hard to get a good match. There are crappy breeders out there who throw two dogs together and you have absolutely no idea what you're getting, just as there are stellar breeders who devote their lives to studying bloodlines and titling their dogs. Either way you decide to go, just do your research.
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Old 12-18-2013, 08:10 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Dogs in rescue are not all going to have issues. How many dogs could:
  • Sit in a shelter, surrounded by other dogs, maybe in with 7 other dogs in one pen and not enough food for all, being barked at, smelling sickness and death after either being dropped off there or being picked up while stray
  • Get poked and prodded by strangers and have a fake hand coming at them while they are eating and not react
  • Get tested with other dogs and cats and do well with both
  • Get thrown into a stranger's car, go to a vet office where they are given the same kind of exams your dogs do, blood draws, vaccines, but without a person they know to help them.
  • Maybe go on a 1 or 2 day transport, being transferred to a new stranger every hour, having to potty on a leash, stay overnight in another stranger's house, or another type of transport in a van with 20-30 other strange dogs
  • Until they land in a foster home probably with other dogs, cats and maybe even kids, get thrown in a tub and then, maybe, they could rest before going on to the next new thing
Not so bad. You can find so many "training wheels" GSDs in rescue - ones that are ready to relax and settle down and just be a good dog.

A great breeder is the other option and yes, you can do both over time.

But llike loveecho says - if you look for either a really good breeder or a really good rescue and find a match, you will be okay - it just takes work to get both. But it will save you so much time in the long run! Know who you are supporting - either with your money or the adoption donation - and how they will support you through your dog's life.

Good luck!
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Old 12-18-2013, 09:05 AM   #7 (permalink)
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You can make a morally sound decision on either side of the coin. I don't think it is about WHICH decision you make as much as it is about the thought you put into it and the effort you make to choose what will be best for you and your household and for the dog.

I will flatly not consider a rescue. Won't do it. There are some key (for me) reasons underlying this. A moral decision is to bring in a dog who stands an overwhelming chance of staying in the home, not a dog who is already on probation in one's mind. For me, the dog who does stand that chance is a puppy who will know nothing but our home.

Rescuing a dog in the name of doing the "more socially responsible" thing is actually very irresponsible if one does not think they are up for the challenges that can come with a rescue dog, just like buying a puppy and not being prepared to deal with the "fun" (and fun) of the developmental stages would be irresponsible. Pick your poison.
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Old 12-18-2013, 09:14 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Why must it be mutually exclusive? I have four dogs right now, two purebred from breeders and two that are mixes from rescues. One of them I co-bred, but I'm also actively involved in a local rescue. I get whatever dog "fits" and don't feel guilty about my choices.
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Old 12-18-2013, 09:39 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Why not do both?

I have a co worker that has a purebred dog and a mix from the shelter and that's the way she has always done it. If the PB passes away then she gets another PB, when the mix passes away so goes out and adopts another mix.

I have 2 purebred dogs and a purebred cat. I also have 3 cats that I adopted from a shelter. I will always have a purebred dog from a reputable breeder but someday I would like to adopt some sort of black and white, medium sized, fluffy dog mix. If ever I were to get more cats I will always rescue them.
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Old 12-18-2013, 09:52 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liesje View Post
Why must it be mutually exclusive? I have four dogs right now, two purebred from breeders and two that are mixes from rescues. One of them I co-bred, but I'm also actively involved in a local rescue. I get whatever dog "fits" and don't feel guilty about my choices.
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