K9's in the schools - German Shepherd Dog Forums

Increase font size: 0, 10, 25, 50%

GermanShepherds.com is the premier German Shepherd Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-06-2013, 07:43 PM   #1 (permalink)
Member
 
Catterman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Eastern NC
Posts: 86
Default K9's in the schools

Well, i guess the anti's and the gun rights folks may be able to meet in the middle in the future. This is already implemented in Ohio. Good for them.
Although i fully support guns in the correct hands inside schools is a good idea, i also really support this idea.


http://www.charlotteobserver.com/201...l#.UnrRlyhl9S-
__________________
- 'Merica.
Catterman is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-06-2013, 07:44 PM   #2 (permalink)
Knighted Member
 
Wild Wolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Canada
Posts: 3,140
Default

The link doesn't work, but would be interested in reading this article!
__________________
SG S-Hunter vom Geistwasser CA CGN TT (Airport Wildlife Control K9)
Zenna vom Geistwasser

"May my enemies live long so they can see me progress."


www.germanshepherdguide.com
Wild Wolf is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2013, 07:57 PM   #3 (permalink)
New Member
 
maxgsd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: ohio
Posts: 20
Default

Advocates believe dogs will make schools safer | CharlotteObserver.com I think this is it.
maxgsd is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2013, 07:59 PM   #4 (permalink)
Member
 
Catterman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Eastern NC
Posts: 86
Default

LOS ANGELES While some say school safety hinges on guns, cameras or alarms in classrooms, Mark Gomer and Kristi Schiller think specially trained dogs should take point in preventing violence in schools.

Gomer's for-profit company has sent a gun- and drug-detecting dog to patrol the halls of an Ohio high school, while Schiller is launching a nonprofit in Houston to give schools the trained canines for free. Their programs are still in their infancy, so questions remain about dogs that can distract, scare or send kids into sneezing fits. But they think they can cultivate their ideas to help schools across the country stay safe.

Gomer's first full-time safety dog is a year-old Dutch shepherd named Atticus, who reported to duty this school year at Oak Hills High School in Green Township in southwest Ohio.

The dog trained at the school before the summer break, said Gomer, co-owner of American Success Dog Training in Bridgetown, Ohio. As part of the company's School Protection Dog program, Atticus learned on the job about marching bands and school bells and the thunk of books hitting a locker.

Gomer, who has trained about 8,000 dogs over 20 years and has three children in the school district, suggested the dog after 20 students and six teachers were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.

Atticus has won over students, parents, teachers and district Superintendent Todd Yohey, who initially worried what people would think of him spending $10,000 on a dog.

Gomer has talked to a lot of parents and faculty, and they are saying it was money well-spent, he said.

Atticus spends his days on a leash with two security guards and goes home with Principal John Stoddard at night. Messages left for Stoddard were not immediately returned.

For her part, Schiller is looking to provide safety dogs to schools free of charge. She hopes her new initiative, K9s4KIDs, does for schools what her K9s4COPs did for police departments. She has placed more than 60 dogs with agencies in three years.

"These canines are extremely social, yet highly qualified warriors that are accustomed to going straight to the source of a threat or shooter and disengaging the suspect armed with the weapon," said Schiller, a Houston mother and philanthropist.

The idea for K9s4KIDs grew out of school shootings and suggestions on applications for police dogs, she said.

"Something that came up was the lack of campus police or sufficient support for the law enforcement agencies that responded," Schiller said.

If a school applies for and is chosen to receive a dog, it will come fully trained and paid for. Buying and training a safety dog costs between $10,000 and $15,000, she said.

Schiller said it would be up to school officials to decide who will handle the dogs, what they will be trained to search for, and if a dog will be assigned to one school or several in a district.

Schools will also have to consider the expense of providing medical care, food, a home and handler for the dog.

As the programs get up and running, questions remain about possible health problems and distractions the dogs can cause.

But Gomer said that fear and allergies are nothing new. He said police departments have been bringing dogs into schools for years, and some children with disabilities use them, too.

"If a child is allergic or extremely fearful, the (safety) dog will steer clear," he said.

A school safety expert said those are concerns parents and schools will have to work out. Ken Trump, president of the Cleveland-based National School Safety and Security Services consulting firm, discussed the issue in general because he was not familiar with either program.

He said the dogs would have to be extremely social to deal with students' initial excitement.

"Kids are going to be all over those dogs," Trump said. "There are concerns to work around, but with the right dogs and right handlers and the right policies and procedures, they should be very beneficial."

He said the dogs encountering a gunman would be a benefit, but the relationships the kids build with the dogs and handlers and the sense of well-being they create will probably be more lasting and life-changing.

The dogs might be a distraction in the beginning, but they will become part of what students expect to see when they go to school, Trump said.

"There is so much these dogs can do, and they're always coming up with new ideas," said Ted Dahlin, a Harris County, Texas, constable's deputy who serves on the K9s4COPs board of directors. "If I were going to pick a school to make trouble, it would be one I knew didn't have a dog."

Read more here: Advocates believe dogs will make schools safer | CharlotteObserver.com
__________________
- 'Merica.
Catterman is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2014, 04:31 PM   #5 (permalink)
New Member
 
CroMacster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 18
Default

All of the links seem to be broken, and I can't find the article on the Charolette Observer website.

When I was in high school the cops would run dogs through our school and parking lot twice a week. I know they busted people for drugs with the dogs, I suppose they could have been looking for weapons as well. One person did get busted with a hunting rifle in their truck due to the dogs.
CroMacster is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2014, 05:24 PM   #6 (permalink)
Master Member
 
mcdanfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 599
Default

I approve of the idea....I have always asked...if they protect our money with police and guards, our politicians, celebrity types....why are we not protecting our kids with the same level of defense?
This would be money well spent. And after seeing how protective our dogs are of other people children...I have no doubt these dogs would excel in
protecting kids.
Sadly to many of the wrong people have guns and no enough of the right ones....if we can't have armed guards when they advertise our children are easy targets with "gun free zone" signs...I think they should have to provide some means of protection.

Great share....thanks!


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
mcdanfam is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2014, 05:47 PM   #7 (permalink)
Master Member
 
Sp00ks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: NC
Posts: 824
Default

When I was in middle school in south Florida in the, well.... Late 70's. They walked dogs down the hall every day.
__________________
Dagr "Dag" 11/07/2013-
Sp00ks is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2014, 05:59 PM   #8 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Mrs.P's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Celebration, FL
Posts: 420
Default

Interesting! The school I teach at is very fortunate to have an armed LEO full-time -he is a nice presence. We get K9 sweeps once in a while always stirs up the kids though.
Mrs.P is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2014, 06:33 PM   #9 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Oisin's Aoire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North NJ
Posts: 478
Default

We have armed LEO as well , so happy we do. I would love to see K9s as well !
__________________
Alvin - GSD - born @ late February 2013
Bo - Boxer/Hound - born @ late June 2008
Greta - English Mastiff - born somewhere between 2003 and 2005 ,estimated.
ALL MY RESCUES!
Oisin's Aoire is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-09-2014, 06:44 PM   #10 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Muskeg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Igloo
Posts: 300
Default

I'm all for LEOs in schools to protect our kids, but I'm not sure a dual-purpose K9 is appropriate.

A single purpose detection dog could be many breeds, including the more affable Labrador. A kid bent on killing other kids and then himself (most school shooters) wouldn't hesitate to kill a dog, too. A dual-purpose dog may be a deterrent, but so is a LEO. I also imagine a school shooting scenario, with panicked kids running down the halls, injured kids down. It might be difficult for even the best K9 to know to target the shooter rather than a panicked kid.

From what I understand, dual-purpose K9s are most useful for pursuit of a fleeing or combative subject, area searches, using their extra senses to detect a threat to the handler, and basic intimidation (stop or I'll send the dog). I think there are better solutions for school security and child safety.

Just like a dog, kids almost always give lots of warning signals before they "attack".
Muskeg is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:15 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
PetGuide.com
Basset Hound Forum Doberman Forum Golden Retriever Forum Beagle Forum
Boxer Forum Dog Forum Pit Bull Forum Poodle Forum
Bulldog Forum Fish Forum Havanese Forum Maltese Forum
Cat Forum German Shepherd Forum Labradoodle Forum Yorkie Forum Hedgehog Forum
Chihuahua Forum Retriever Breeds Cichlid Forum Dart Frog Forum Mice Breeder Forum