German Shepherd Dog Forums

German Shepherd Dog Forums (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/)
-   Basic Care (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/basic-care/)
-   -   Neuter or not (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/basic-care/462009-neuter-not.html)

Ace GSD 06-19-2014 10:38 AM

Neuter or not
 
Hey guys i need an honest opinion from some of you that actually have many experience have intact and neutered male GSD or any large breed ( ofc everyone else is free to reply too )
Cause i read so many articles .so many posts and i get conflicting informations. Are vets telling us to neuter cause the gov make them too ? I read many negAtive effects too . In a way i feel that neutering my dog does not make me a responsible owner but its the other way arround and also feels like i betray my dog. Please share your experience with intact males too.

Thanks
Ace' dad :)

Atika 06-19-2014 11:00 AM

Hi Ace, My breeder advised not to neuter. He felt owner should be responsible by separating from females when necessary. I am tossed on the subject too. It will be interesting to hear people weigh in.
I have a male 5mos and female 4mos. I will need to make a decision soon.

eddie1976E 06-19-2014 11:06 AM

Vets push it because most American's are not responsible owners and can't keep their pets from "accidentally" reproducing. From what I have seen and read, a male dog will not develop fully if he doesn't have the hormones that are needed. He may look less masculine, leggy, not as thick, etc. My breeder who is also a vet recommends not neutering till at lease 14 months (maybe longer, can't remember). I will wait till he is 2 or older, or never, not sure....haven't decided. I also found out that neutering at a young age can have bone development issues...arthritis, etc.

For me, since I don't let me dog out of my sight, he is never out with out me being out with him, I feel I can avoid neutering without worrying about him knocking up someone.

jocoyn 06-19-2014 11:06 AM

I have an intact male and have had a few. They need a good bit more management and you face the prospect of enlarged prostate down the road. There are a ton of threads on the topic already. You may want to search the forum.

Having a female in house adds to the complexity of the topic because, even if you keep them separate, the males may not eat and be severely distracted by the female in the house. Some folks I know board the males during the female heat.

MaggieRoseLee 06-19-2014 11:07 AM

Once your dog is physically mature, then it's up to how responsible you are as a dog owner. If there is a chance he may get loose and that may end up in unwanted puppies, then get him neutered.

If there is NO chance cause you are able to keep him safe and secure, and if his temperament is what you want, and he's trained well to be reliable, then it's up to you.

More info to help with the decision on --> http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum...ay-neuter.html

my boy diesel 06-19-2014 11:14 AM

Vets push it because most American's are not responsible owners and can't keep their pets from "accidentally" reproducing.

exactly this
it takes a lot of supervision and there are other issues that can arise like aggression esp towards other males
also as mentioned prostate issues down the road
and other reproductive cancers
there is always a trade off
also looks are determined more by genetics than early neuter except there seems to be a propensity towards extra bone growth making the dog slightly taller if neutered earlier than later

martemchik 06-19-2014 11:28 AM

I always say it’s a lifestyle decision more than a dog decision. You need to figure out what you want to do with your dog, and how keeping him intact, or her intact will affect that. If you like to go to places where your dog is off-leash with other dogs, more than likely you’ll need to neuter. If you take your dog or plan on taking your dog to daycare…you’ll need to neuter.

It’s not super difficult to keep your dog contained, my dog doesn’t jump a 4 foot fence to wander when/if he smells a female in heat. But when I walk him, I can definitely see the difference in his behavior when a female in heat is in the neighborhood. It’s also quite difficult to get through to him when a female in heat is within 100 feet of him, the only choice is basically physical restraint and then leaving the area.

I’ve heard a lot of horror stories when you have a female and a male intact and the female goes through a heat. Like…doors and walls being broken through. So that’s not something I’d like to put up with. At the same time, I also hate to crate and rotate and don’t need to deal with that for 2 months out of the year. I like that my dogs can be free around the house to do whatever whenever they want and there is no risk of a tie and then whelping a litter of puppies. I like that I can let both my dogs out into the yard in the morning when I’m half awake, and at night when I come home from a night out and am half asleep. There are no worries.

If not clear, I have an intact male, and a spayed female.

Anubis_Star 06-19-2014 11:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by my boy diesel (Post 5663137)
Vets push it because most American's are not responsible owners and can't keep their pets from "accidentally" reproducing.

exactly this
it takes a lot of supervision and there are other issues that can arise like aggression esp towards other males
also as mentioned prostate issues down the road
and other reproductive cancers
there is always a trade off
also looks are determined more by genetics than early neuter except there seems to be a propensity towards extra bone growth making the dog slightly taller if neutered earlier than later

WHAT other reproductive cancers exactly??

There are NONE associated with an intact male, and it's lies like that thrown around by everyone telling you to neuter your dog at 6 weeks old or they'll die before they're 5 of 100 different mysterious cancers.

Intact males are more susceptible to prostatitis and prostate abscesses as they age. Both can kill your dog, but both can also be treated. NEUTERED dogs are more prone to prostate TUMORS that are non - responsive to most treatments and will eventually kill your dog.

There are really no other health defects associated with having an intact male. No cancers linked to testosterone in the body.

I feel pets should be kept intact until sexual maturity (12-18 months preffered) for their own health BENEFIT. But yes, most people can't handle intact animals so they should be neutered if you can not 100% guarantee your dog is not going to jump the fence or go running off.

As far as behavioral issues... it amazes me when "trainers" recommend early castration to avoid a whole list of behavior problems. Long story short - train your dog. And if someone can't train an intact male to be obedient and not mark in their house, I wouldn't want them as a trainer! I have a neutered male I neutered at 9 months, and I have a 16 month working line male, intact. Both are, surprise surprise, very well behaved, social, obedient, neither has ever dared to mark in the house. I have taken the intact male to schutzhund club every week since he was 8 weeks old, and surprise surprise, 30+ intact dogs and ALL of them are extremely well behaved, and all of them are first and foremost family pets that live in a house. Most with other dogs.

The german shepherd i had to euthanize for extreme fear aggression was neutered at 4 months old... i am not saying that is related, because it's not. That's my point. Sexual organs (or lack of) should play ZERO part in a dog's training or behavior.

Now don't get me wrong. Yes an intact male has an increased chance of dog aggression (although I surprisingly find it seems to be neutered males that go after intact males). Yes an intact animal has an increased instance of roaming. My whole point is, train your dog, contain your dog. Things you should be doing with or without balls.




Sent from Petguide.com Free App

SuperG 06-19-2014 11:33 AM

My opinion would be; allowing any living creature to mature intact is in the creature's best interests......how possibly could there be a counter to this...excepting isolated situations ?

SuperG

my boy diesel 06-19-2014 11:38 AM

the veterinarian dr becker recommends neuter for aggression issues so there must be something to it
how about testicular cancer? yes it happens in older intact males
tumors on the anus or perianal adenomas

Perianal adenomas are small growths in the muscle around the anus. If not removed when small, they grow until they break through the skin, get infected, smell bad and cause a great deal of discomfort to the dog. While perianal adenomas initially are benign, some progress into highly malignant cancers.

Perianal adenomas can be treated by surgical excision or cryosurgery (frozen with liquid nitrogen). If the dog is neutered at the time of surgery, the tumors almost never return. If not neutered, the tumors almost always return. It is extremely rare for a female or a neutered male to have a Perianal adenoma.
Why neutering Male dogs is important


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:16 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2