Recently Adopted GSD-Extreme Protectiveness - German Shepherd Dog Forums

Increase font size: 0, 10, 25, 50%

GermanShepherds.com is the premier German Shepherd Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-21-2012, 12:00 AM   #1 (permalink)
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3
Question Recently Adopted GSD-Extreme Protectiveness

Hello,

Please excuse this VERY long post. I'm at a loss.

On 11/16/2012 (yes, 3 days ago) we adopted what appears to be a pure bred male GSD approximately 4 years old. We spent about 30 minutes with him in the "get to know you" area with all members of the household including our dogs and four year old daughter. He was fantastic! Wanted to play with the dogs, wanted hugs from us, never barked except when in play position with the dogs and gentle with my child.

We decided to adopt him and brought him home. We discovered some other great things! He knows sit, down, stay and began responding to us almost instantly within a couple of hours. He is perfectly housebroken though he will not use the dog door. Seems to have no food or toy aggression period. He doesn't go near the trash or the food on the counters and only seems moderately interested in my cat. He lays calmly when not busy and loves playing ball in the backyard. He comes over every now and then for a lean and a cuddle. He seemed great!!

Sunday night (24 hours after bringing him home) two things happened that have me VERY concerned.

One: he began what I believe is "herding" behavior with my daughter. Nips to the ankles/arms and even nosed her in the face. He whines lightly when this happens and does not bark or growl and I cannot see the trigger except one time she was walking toward the front door. My rottweiler who passed away last year at 2 from a heart defect often nipped at her ankles between the ages of 6 mos and 1 year when they were playing but it was more drooly mouthing and this dog seems to be nipping for real. It has happened a few times since then.

Two: We had 3 people enter the house Sunday even. First, my sister came over. My other dogs bark and rush the door a bit when someone knocks so I didn't think much of him following suit but when we welcomed her in he went berserk. Lunging and barking without ceasing. She is in no way intimidated by dogs and after a few minutes after barking at her he calmed a bit and approached her for cuddles.
However, when my brother-in-law and mother-in-law came over he went at it again. Both are fearful of dogs and he didn't warm up to them period. We kept him leashed and whenever any of them would move he would leave his blanket and lunge and bark. He nipped at my MIL's feet. After about 30 minutes of my brother in law not moving around he went over calmly to sniff and even offered a lick but then started back at the barking and lunging.

I've never witnessed that kind of behavior in an animal to be frank. We took him to the vet today and he greeted dogs in a friendly way but barked a little at the people in the lobby. Once we got into the room however and the vet entered it was serious barking and lunging again. (still no snarling, growling or baring of teeth). They could not examine him in the room with us.

The took him to a separate room in the back to get checked out and once he was out of the room with us immediately calmed. No barking no aggressive reactions nothing. They muzzled him out of concern however but he said he was fine once not in the room with us.

The vet said his behavior is dangerous and doesn't think he should be around my little one. He recommended returning him to animal control as a human aggressive dog. He said protectiveness at that level could indicate prior abuse or inappropriate training and that could be turned against my child. I was hesitant to turn him back in to animal control as I know they would euthanize him. The vet even suggested that may be best!

I'm very concerned about the safety of my daughter and as much as we love our dogs (who are all rescues or adopted from animal control ranging in age from 2 yrs to 15 yrs) I must, and will, put her safety first. The rescues around here are an option but want you to foster the dog until adoption (I understand the very good reason for this as space/time/money are limited) and I don't want to risk my family's safety. I can take him to the humane society here as they have the reputation of working to rehabilitate but that's a euthanasia risk too. I would work on it myself but as I said I've never witnessed this type of behavior in an animal.

He's a long coated male GSD, approx. 4 yrs. old, recently neutered (less than 1 week ago) that came in as a stray. He was moderately clean with clipped nails, immaculate ears and no physical ailments whatsoever including no kennel cough. He is not hand shy, not scared of loud noises, doesn't seem to want to eat dry food as he acts starving and gets excited about the approaching bowl but looks at me like I'm nuts once he sees whats inside. He does love some chicken and rice however.

Any ideas? Thanks so much for taking the time to read this. Any advice is much appreciated.
RebeccaMac is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-21-2012, 12:07 AM   #2 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: ontario -
Posts: 9,178
Default

short and sweet , error in management. "Sunday night (24 hours after bringing him home) two things happened that have me VERY concerned"

You placed the dog in the home without much of an introduction to the house rules , if there are any , dropped him in just like a goldfish into the aquarium .
carmspack is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-21-2012, 12:11 AM   #3 (permalink)
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3
Default

Someone I talked to said that I should have kept folks away for a couple of days and I understand that now but what about the behavior at the vet's office?
RebeccaMac is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-21-2012, 12:21 AM   #4 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Beautiful Pacific NW
Posts: 11,005
Default

Please do this IMMEDIATELY. If the adoption can be saved, this may help. "TWO WEEK SHUT DOWN"
(or return him)

"I introduced her to 15 people" " he was a bit leery but seems to like my other 3 dogs"
"she went everywhere with me "
All in the first few days of the new home..... (!!!)

Two weeks later we read
“I think we will have to rehome the new dog" "the new dog barked and nipped at my kid"
"we had a dog fight"

Ok, folks, here it comes; some feel this is extreme, why? I really do not know.
But when bringing in a new dog, post finding, adoption, buying, etc, Give it time to adjust to you
your family and the dogs in the new environment.

TWO WEEKS - "shut down"
For the first two weeks, (sometimes even longer) a dog takes in the new environment, who is the top
persons, dogs, who ARE these people! By pushing a dog too fast and throwing too much at the dog we look like we are not the leaders and the dog can feel it MUST defend itself, as the leader is surely
no one he has met so far!
We coo, coddle, drag the dog to home to home to person to person, and the dog has NO idea who
we are.
As member Maryellen here said, "This is the dating period NOT the honeymoon"
When you first met your "mate”, you were on your best behavior, you were not relaxed enough to be
all of yourself, were you? Just think of the things you do physically once you get to KNOW a person,
you wouldn’t run up to a stranger and hug them and squeeze them!
Imagine, if on the first date, this new person, was all over you touching you and having their friends hug you
and pat you on the head, and jostle your shoulders, then he whisked you off to another stranger’s home and
they did the same thing. Would you think this person normal and SAFE? Wouldn’t you feel invaded and
begin to get a bit snarky yourself? Wouldn’t you think to push these people away for obviously your date
is out of their mind and they aren’t going to save you from these weirdos!!
Yet we do this to our dogs, and then get upset or worried that they aren’t relaxed and accepting of EVERYTHING
instantly!

By shutting down the dog, it gives the dog TIME to see you, meet YOU, hear and take in the new sounds
and smells of your home.
I crate the dog in a room by itself if possible.(Believe me, dogs are sensory animals, they know more than you think without seeing it).
I take it out on a leash (so I don’t have to correct it ..I don’t have that right yet!), I give it exercise time in the yard,
I do no training at all, just fun exercise and maybe throw some toys for fun, leash the dog if you don’t have a fence outside. But I DO NOT leave my yard, AT ALL.
No car rides, no other dogs, (unless crated beside them), no pet stores, no WALKS even, nothing but me, my home, my yard. (Unless of course the dog needs to go to the veterinarian)
Believe me dogs can live two weeks without walks. Walks are stressful for there is so much coming at you! And the new person you have no clue who they are yet. The dog may react to something and we start correcting it with the leash and we just installed a VERY STRESSFUL moment to the dog!
TEACH the dog by doing the shut down, that YOU are the one to look to, that you are now here for the dog! He can
trust in you and look to you as its new leader!!
In the house I have the dog out only for about 20 minutes post exercise/yard times.
And, ALWAYS on a leash.
Then PUT THE DOG AWAY. Let it absorb and think.
I do not introduce the dogs for these two weeks, they can be side by side in the crates, (not nose to nose for they can feel defensive) . Some dogs will bond instantly with the other dogs if we don’t bond FIRST with the dog, and this can lead to some other issues, as the dog will look to the other dog(s) for guidance and not YOU!

Literally in two weeks you will see a change in the dog and begin to see its honest and true personality.
Just like a house guest...they are well behaved and literally shut down themselves these first few weeks, then
post this time, they relax and the true personality begins to shine thru!


So, please, if nothing else for your new dog, give it the time to LEARN YOU as you are learning who they are!
This method works on shy dogs, confident dogs, abuse cases, chained dogs that come in, rowdy dogs, all temperaments!

(From PBF’s “luvnfstuff”, revised for spelling errors)
msvette2u is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-21-2012, 12:25 AM   #5 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: ontario -
Posts: 9,178
Default

the vet should have known this ! did he know you only had him for a day or two and what the circumstances were? Instead he says "The vet said his behavior is dangerous and doesn't think he should be around my little one. He recommended returning him to animal control as a human aggressive dog" .
Even your initial meeting with the dog was overwhelming . "We spent about 30 minutes with him in the "get to know you" area with all members of the household including our dogs and four year old daughter. He was fantastic! Wanted to play with the dogs, wanted hugs from us, never barked except when in play position with the dogs and gentle with my child." Lots of stimulation including having your current dogs thrust on him . A dangerous dog does not behave like this.

Your vet's statement may lead to the dog being euthanized ---- hooo-- I am the first to say that a unsalvageable risky fear aggressive dog has a better end if put to sleep , for its own self and the welfare of those it would come in contact with -- but from the sounds of it NOT this dog !!

He is confused and hasn't found his bearings , needs to be taught manners , by clear and fair and mutually respectful boundaries .

Last edited by carmspack; 11-21-2012 at 12:34 AM.
carmspack is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-21-2012, 12:35 AM   #6 (permalink)
Master Member
 
dazedtrucker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Topeka, KS
Posts: 770
Default

My take is you have a GSD that has been through alot of BS lately. I wouldn't panic just yet. GSDs are naturally protective.. if my dog was doing this, I would rack it up to instinct, and too much too fast for him. He's totally stressed out. (I snap at people when I'm at the end of my rope too, doesn't matter if it makes sense.. ) Give him a "shut down" time. (you can find more info on how to do that here, or someone will explain). Give him as much down time as you can. No vet, no kids, no going out... just let him settle in for a few weeks. Use the crate, and just spend one on one time with him. Introduce him slowly to being out and about and around the kids. Mine is a little nervy, and will "herd" my now 5 year old. If he thinks something is a threat he will "herd" his child away with some force. No AGGRESSION towards the child, just firmly, and sometimes physically placing himself in between (yes, this may knock a small child down). If he is not resource guarding, I would give it a solid chance. He is probably just stressed beyond his limits, and trying to do the right thing in his own way.
__________________
I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do.
- Edward Everett Hale
dazedtrucker is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-21-2012, 12:36 AM   #7 (permalink)
Master Member
 
dazedtrucker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Topeka, KS
Posts: 770
Default

obviously... I type too slow your answers are below
__________________
I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do.
- Edward Everett Hale
dazedtrucker is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-21-2012, 12:39 AM   #8 (permalink)
Master Member
 
dazedtrucker's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Topeka, KS
Posts: 770
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by carmspack View Post
the vet should have known this ! did he know you only had him for a day or two and what the circumstances were? Instead he says "The vet said his behavior is dangerous and doesn't think he should be around my little one. He recommended returning him to animal control as a human aggressive dog" .
Even your initial meeting with the dog was overwhelming . "We spent about 30 minutes with him in the "get to know you" area with all members of the household including our dogs and four year old daughter. He was fantastic! Wanted to play with the dogs, wanted hugs from us, never barked except when in play position with the dogs and gentle with my child." Lots of stimulation including having your current dogs thrust on him . A dangerous dog does not behave like this.

Your vet's statement may lead to the dog being euthanized ---- hooo-- I am the first to say that a unsalvageable risky fear aggressive dog has a better end if put to sleep , for its own self and the welfare of those it would come in contact with -- but from the sounds of it NOT this dog !!

He is confused and hasn't found his bearings , needs to be taught manners , by clear and fair and mutually respectful boundaries .
What she said!!!!
__________________
I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do.
- Edward Everett Hale
dazedtrucker is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-21-2012, 12:42 AM   #9 (permalink)
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 12
Default

This behavior is to be expected until he feels safe with his new family, especially true for a rescued GSD. I highly agree with the two-week shutdown. Sounds like a very intelligent dog, and I hope you decide to keep him and provide a loving home. =)
I am also surprised at the vet did not say anything.


Sent from my iPhone using Petguide.com Free App
chad2809 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-21-2012, 12:53 AM   #10 (permalink)
Knighted Member
 
wolfy dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 3,007
Default

Most vets don't have a clue about behavior. I agree with taking it easy with him and let him bond with the family. Lots of positive interaction and rewards for good behavior towards in general and your child. Keep the child away from the dog if you cannot watch or manage both. Does he have nice place for himself to retreat? Do the other dogs overwhelm him? He needs his cues from you, not from them. Avoid high value resources lying around until he is fully integrated in the family. Give him a break and take it easy and keep us posted. Thanks for asking for help instead of returning him, that was smart.
wolfy dog is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:50 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
PetGuide.com
Basset Hound Forum Doberman Forum Golden Retriever Forum Beagle Forum
Boxer Forum Dog Forum Pit Bull Forum Poodle Forum
Bulldog Forum Fish Forum Havanese Forum Maltese Forum
Cat Forum German Shepherd Forum Labradoodle Forum Yorkie Forum Hedgehog Forum
Chihuahua Forum Retriever Breeds Cichlid Forum Dart Frog Forum Mice Breeder Forum